Soviet Zone


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to Soviet Zone: Soviet Union

Soviet Zone

n
(Placename) that part of Germany occupied by Soviet forces in 1945–49: transformed into the German Democratic Republic in 1949–50. Also called: Russian Zone
References in periodicals archive ?
DEFA wanted to appeal to German film-going audiences in a style that would also re-educate them, but, in the aftermath of World War Two, intellectuals in the Soviet zone agreed that the cinema of the Hitler dictatorship should be rejected and that a new kind of film should take its place.
Ethnic Cleansing in 20th Century Europe (Harvard), and The Russians in Germany: The History of the Soviet Zone of Occupation (Harvard).
The third stamp was issued in the Soviet zone in June 1945.
He displayed his diplomatic passport from those days, which had allowed him once to bicycle into the city's Soviet Zone.
Berlin, the German capital, though located 115 miles inside the Soviet Zone, was also divided into four sectors, with the Soviets occupying the eastern half of the city.
These blows, coupled with land reform in the Soviet zone of occupation, "spelled the end of the Junker landowning class" (381) that had long played a central role in German history.
The situation had arisen following the division of Germany after its 1945 surrender into four zones, administered by the four victorious powers (UK, France, USA, USSR); Berlin, 100 miles into the Soviet zone, was likewise divided.
From Norman Naimark's examination of Russian troops' presence and actions in Germany in Russians in Germany: A History of the Soviet Zone of Occupation, 1945-1949 (Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1995) to Petra Goedde's analysis of postwar gender relations and sexual politics in her GIs and Germans: Culture, Gender, and Foreign Relations, 1945-1949 (New Haven, 2003), the gamut of topics that historians have covered is impressive.
Mr Connor looks at the background to these people's plight (the Nazi settlement schemes), the size of the problem, relations between refugees and local people, the political impact of the resettlement, the nature of the refugees' integration after 1950 (in economic, social and political terms), the fear that the refugees' poverty would turn them to radical politics (a particularly interesting chapter) and finally, a look at the situation in the Soviet zone and East Germany where the refugees had a far harder time.
acquiesced in a Soviet zone of influence while propping up despots who opposed the Soviet Union, all to maintain a global balance of power.
THE Stasi, or Ministry for State Security (Staatsicherheit), was created in 1950 by East German communists in the Soviet zone of occupied post-World War II Germany and disbanded with the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989.
Berlin, situated in the Soviet zone, was also divided into these four zones.
Full browser ?