Sovietologist


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So·vi·et·ol·o·gy

 (sō′vē-ĭ-tŏl′ə-jē, sŏv′ē-)
n.
Study of the former Soviet Union, especially of its government.

So′vi·et·ol′o·gist n.

Sovietologist

(ˌsəʊvɪəˈtɒlədʒɪst; ˌsɒv-)
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a person who has studied the political policies and developments of the former Soviet government
Translations

Sovietologist

[ˌsəʊviəˈtɒlədʒɪst] Nsovietólogo/a m/f

Sovietologist

nSowjetologe m, → Sowjetologin f
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References in periodicals archive ?
A prominent NZ Sovietologist (who prefers not to be named) suggested to me that Gilbert was the wrong man for the job of NZSIS first head--a career army officer who modelled everything on the British way and on MI5 in particular.
3) Including the Russian historian and Sovietologist Richard Pipes and the specialist on Soviet Muslims Alexander Bennigsen.
SOME THIRTY YEARS AGO, the Sovietologist and socialist Alexander Nove wrote his influential book The Economics of Feasible Socialism.
Unfortunately, the expression langue de bois is often incorrectly used to stigmatize different political speeches, that are not necessarily linked to the traits identified by Patrick Seriot and later taken over by the Sovietologist linguist Francoise Thom.
Since this young Sovietologist first appeared in President George Bush Sr.
Military and State Department veteran who traveled the world as a Sovietologist before returning to his home state of Colorado in 1995 and entering public education.
The strategy had been partly inspired by French Sovietologist Helene Carrere d'Encausse who, in her book The Fragmented Empire, predicted the disintegration of the USSR as a result of Muslim minorities' revolt.
An American Sovietologist, a specialist in Russian history, told me about a curious episode.
His new Secretary of State, Condoleezza Rice, is a career Sovietologist who has never shown much interest in Latin America other than seeking opportunities to punish Cuba's Fidel Castro.
He is the elder son of Richard Pipes, the renowned Sovietologist at Harvard who left an important mark on the politics of the cold war--and perhaps the current era as well.
The great Sovietologist Robert Conquest, writing in 1969, remarked that "[T]he Khrushchev interlude, however inadequate it appeared at the time, must now be looked back on as, comparatively speaking, a veritable Camelot" (Robert Conquest, "A Degenerate Dynasty: Michael Tatu," reprinted in his Tyrants and Typewriters: Communiques in the Struggle for Truth (Hutchinson, London, 1989), page 167.