Soviets


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Related to Soviets: duma

Soviets

(ˈsəʊvɪəts; ˈsɒv-)
n
1. (Peoples) the people or government of the former Soviet Union
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the people or government of the former Soviet Union
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Soviets - the government of the Soviet Union; "the Soviets said they wanted to increase trade with Europe"
political science, politics, government - the study of government of states and other political units
state - the group of people comprising the government of a sovereign state; "the state has lowered its income tax"
References in classic literature ?
Primarily: examinations, when we perform the bodily movement of writing it down; conversation, when we assert it to display our historical erudition; and political discourses, when we are engaged in showing what Soviet government leads to.
With characteristic understatement, the socialist folk singer Pete Seeger observed that Reed "allowed the Soviets to boost him to 'stardom' and found out too late what a trap that can be.
A prodigious apologist, Schrecker in one article conceded that Julius and Ethel Rosenberg delivered atomic secrets to the Soviets, then plaintively demanded: "Were these activities so awful?
But how those interests would be interpreted in practice was up to three bodies: the guardianship and wardship agencies (organy opeki i popechitel'stva) that carried out the initial investigations of adopters and adopters and then made their recommendations; the soviets of workers' deputies that finalized adoptions; and, in custodial contests, the courts.
The group, which included Stephen Sachs, Graham Allison, Stanley Fischer, and Robert Black will, drew up what they termed a "grand bargain" which recommended granting the Soviets $15 to $30 billion per year for several years.
Yugoslavia's Josef Tito, for example, inveigled America into giving him aid money, and then pointed to the American fleet just off his coast if the Soviets thought about invading.
The Soviets were allies of the United States in the war against Germany and Japan, but even before the war ended, Washington feared Soviet ambitions in spreading Communism worldwide.
The Nazis had fled as the Soviets approached, driving nearly 60,000 prisoners with them in a forced march that killed more than 15,000.
The thought that she would lose that freedom and everything she had thus far known as her life by 1939, when the Soviets forcefully occupied the Baltic States--Latvia, Estonia, Lithuania--was incomprehensible, unimaginable.
The Soviets began ambitious research programs and their submarine technology drew ahead even as the Americans diverted their attention to Vietnam.
Kalinin, nominal Head of State as Chairman of the All-Russian Central Executive Committee of Soviets of the RSFSR, and often viewed as a "peasant" spokesman within the leadership.
The Soviets had quite a capability to launch reconnaissance satellites to watch what was going on.