Spanish American


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Related to Spanish American: Mexican American

Spanish American

also Span·ish-A·mer·i·can (spăn′ĭsh-ə-mĕr′ĭ-kən)
n.
1. A native or inhabitant of Spanish America.
2. A US citizen or resident of Hispanic ancestry. See Usage Note at Hispanic.
adj. Spanish-American
1. Of or relating to Spanish America or its peoples or cultures.
2. Of or relating to Spain and America, especially the United States.

Span′ish Amer′ican


n.
1. a citizen or resident of the U.S. of Spanish birth or descent.
2. a descendant of the Spanish-speaking population in parts of Mexico annexed by the U.S. as a result of the Texas revolt and the Mexican War.
3. a native or inhabitant of Spanish America.

Span′ish-Amer′ican



adj.
1. of or pertaining to Spanish America or its inhabitants.
2. belonging to, pertaining to, or involving both Spain and the U.S., or the people of the two countries.
3. of or pertaining to Spanish Americans.
[1780–90, Amer.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Spanish American - an American whose first language is SpanishSpanish American - an American whose first language is Spanish
American - a native or inhabitant of the United States
criollo - a Spanish American of pure European stock (usually Spanish); "Mexico is a country of mestizos, criollos, and indigenes"
Translations

Spanish American

[ˈspænɪʃəˈmerɪkən]
A. ADJhispanoamericano
B. Nhispanoamericano/a m/f
References in periodicals archive ?
They honored him for his support of NFLT's efforts to preserve the 1898 Spanish American War Fort.
This study of early modern Spanish American history analyzes the process leading to the creation of the viceroyalty of Granada.
Synopsis: "Textual Exposures: Photography in Twentieth-Century Spanish American Narrative Fiction" examines how twentieth-century Spanish American literature has registered photography's powers and limitations and the creative ways in which writers of this region of the Americas have elaborated the conventions and assumptions of this medium in fictional form.
LEOMINSTER -- The Spanish American Center is preparing more than 100 hot meals twice a week for displaced families living in local hotels thanks to funding provided by the Community Foundation of North Central Massachusetts.
1978), "The New Spanish American Narrative", Pacific Quarterly, 3, 1, pp.
This collection of writings by notable Spanish American figures from the fields of politics, philosophy, creative writing, and culture in general, is a welcomed contribution to the critical reflection on the subject of Latin American views of the United States.
With a few notable exceptions, current-day Spanish American novelists have not received anywhere near the attention that has been given to their illustrious, canonized predecessors.
Although much of US Latino literature is currently being written in English, the editors conclude that the influence of these writers and their works on Spanish American letters, both in English and in Spanish translation, merits their inclusion in this volume.
Behind Closed Doors: Art in the Spanish American Home, 1492-1898 is the first major exhibition in the United States to explore the private lives and interiors of Spain's New World elite from 1492 through the nineteenth century, focusing on the house as a principal repository of fine and decorative art.
Burkholder devotes considerable attention to creole-peninsular conflict in the Catholic Church, arguing that creole-peninsular competition was more evident in the male religious orders than in most other domains of Spanish American society.
Venegas, Jose Luis, Decolonizing Modernism--James Joyce and the Development of Spanish American Fiction.