Spenserian stanza


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Spenserian stanza

n.
A stanza consisting of eight lines of iambic pentameter and a final alexandrine, rhymed ababbcbcc, first used by Edmund Spenser in The Faerie Queene.

Spenserian stanza

n
(Poetry) prosody the stanza form used by the poet Spenser in his poem The Faerie Queene, consisting of eight lines in iambic pentameter and a concluding Alexandrine, rhyming a b a b b c b c c

Spense′rian stan′za


n.
the stanza used by Spenser in his Faerie Queene (1590–96), consisting of eight iambic pentameter lines and a final Alexandrine, with a rhyme scheme of ababbcbcc.
[1810–20]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Spenserian stanza - a stanza with eight lines of iambic pentameter and a concluding Alexandrine with the rhyme pattern abab bcbc c; "the Spenserian stanza was introduced by Edmund Spenser in The Faerie Queene"
stanza - a fixed number of lines of verse forming a unit of a poem
References in classic literature ?
Spenser invented for himself a new stanza of nine lines and made it famous, so that we call it after him, the Spenserian Stanza.
I wrote, I wrote everything--ponderous essays, scientific and sociological short stories, humorous verse, verse of all sorts from triolets and sonnets to blank verse tragedy and elephantine epics in Spenserian stanzas.
While the Hermit can craft full sermons in Spenserian stanza form, these characters can barely frame one lousy foot.
This is not the Spenserian stanza, in which the lengthened last line turns each stanza into a distinct aesthetic unit.
One part of this research program would explore a family of longer, relatively complex stanza forms featuring interlaced end-rhymes, including ottava rima, rhyme royal, the Spenserian stanza, and the Onegin stanza, and their variants.
The second half of the stanza then implies something only a little less likely: that a dreamer could not only start speaking at the instant of awakening but also instantly transcribe his speech in verse, scribbling a Spenserian stanza on the deck of a pitching ship.
Scott would respond to Gertrude in The Vision of Don Roderick (1811) a poem on colonial themes set in a foreign country and composed in the Spenserian stanza used by Campbell, though in the Gothic manner that was Scott's trademark.
Although the AABA pattern had never before been used for discrete quatrains, it appears at the very heart of the Spenserian stanza.
Of the seven essays on The Faerie Queene, three have been published previously: Andrew King's piece on the "medieval" structure of the poem (appearing in the 2001 Review of English Studies); Syrthie Pugh's "Acrasia and Bondage: Guyon's Perversion of the Ovidian Erotic in book 2 of The Faerie Queene," which repeats a chapter in her Spenser and Ovid (2005); and Catherine Addison's contribution on the Spenserian stanza, available in The Southern African Journal of Medieval and Renaissance Studies (2002).
Jeff Dolven and Kenneth Gross each offer an individual analysis of a single Spenserian stanza as an entryway into talking about the work of the stanza throughout the poem.
Tighe's elaborate Psyche, assembled over six substantial cantos and written in the exacting form of Spenserian stanza, was an instant classic, securing Tighe's fame on two continents.
In this essay I explore whether the opposite might be true, whether in fact the poet of The Faerie Queene is most visible in those parts of the Calender that bear the least formal resemblance to the Spenserian stanza.