mysticism

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mys·ti·cism

 (mĭs′tĭ-sĭz′əm)
n.
1.
a. Belief in direct experience of transcendent reality or God, especially by means of contemplation and asceticism instead of rational thought.
b. Such experience had by an individual.
2. Belief in the existence of realities beyond perceptual or intellectual apprehension that are directly accessible by subjective experience: belief in séances, astral projection, and similar mysticism.
3. Belief that is not based on evidence or subjected to criticism: "[When] grappling with the evils they have themselves exposed ... these lifelong Marxists drift off into vague mysticism and into worship of personality" (I.F. Stone).

mysticism

(ˈmɪstɪˌsɪzəm)
n
1. belief in or experience of a reality surpassing normal human understanding or experience, esp a reality perceived as essential to the nature of life
2. (Theology) a system of contemplative prayer and spirituality aimed at achieving direct intuitive experience of the divine
3. obscure or confused belief or thought

mys•ti•cism

(ˈmɪs təˌsɪz əm)

n.
1. the beliefs, ideas, or mode of thought of mystics.
2. the doctrine of an immediate spiritual intuition of truths believed to transcend ordinary understanding, or of a direct, intimate union of the soul with God through contemplation or spiritual ecstasy.
3. obscure thought or speculation.
[1730–40]

Mysticism


the mystical teachings of Jakob Boehme (1575-1624), an influence on George Fox and Quakerism. — Boehmenist, Boehmist, Boehmenite, n.
the mystical theories of Antoinette Bourignon (1616-80), popular in the Netherlands and in Scotland.
the beliefs and practices of pre-Christian and early Christian sects, condemned by the church, especially the conviction that matter is evil and that knowledge is more important than faith, and the practice of esoteric mysticism. — Gnostic, n., adj.
1. the occult concepts, ideas, or philosophy set forth in the writings of the hermeticists of the late Middle Ages and the early Renaissance.
2. adherence to, belief in, or propagation of these concepts and ideas.
3. Literature. a symbolic and arcane style similar to that of the hermeticists, especially in the poetry of certain French symbolist poets. — hermeticist, hermetist, n. — hermetic, hermetical, adj.
the doctrine that knowledge of the Absolute is within human reach, but through a higher religious consciousness rather than by logical processes. See also god and gods. — metagnostic, adj.
1. the principles, doctrines, and practices of mysticism.
2. the interpretation of mysteries, as the Eleusinian. — mystagogue, n. — mystagogic, mystagogical, adj.
a teacher of mystical doctrines.
the practice of staring at one’s navel to induce a mystical trance. Also called omphaloskepsis. — omphalopsychite, n.
the Gnostic concept of the spiritual world, representing the fullness of the Divine Being and the eons emanating therefrom.
1. any of various forms of philosophical or religious thought claiming a mystical insight into the divine nature and natural phenomena.
2. (cap.) the system of belief and practice of the Theosophical Society. — theosophist, n. — theosophical, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mysticism - a religion based on mystical communion with an ultimate realitymysticism - a religion based on mystical communion with an ultimate reality
faith, religion, religious belief - a strong belief in a supernatural power or powers that control human destiny; "he lost his faith but not his morality"
quietism - a form of religious mysticism requiring withdrawal from all human effort and passive contemplation of God
Sufism - Islamic mysticism
2.mysticism - obscure or irrational thought
cerebration, intellection, mentation, thinking, thought process, thought - the process of using your mind to consider something carefully; "thinking always made him frown"; "she paused for thought"
Translations
misticizam

mysticism

[ˈmɪstɪsɪzəm] Nmisticismo m; (= doctrine, literary genre) → mística f

mysticism

[ˈmɪstɪsɪzəm] nmysticisme m

mysticism

nMystizismus m; (of poetry etc)Mystik f, → Mystische(s) nt

mysticism

[ˈmɪˌstɪsɪzm] nmisticismo
References in classic literature ?
Metaphors and precedents were not wanting; peculiar spiritual experiences were not wanting which at last made the retention of his position seem a service demanded of him: the vista of a fortune had already opened itself, and Bulstrode's shrinking remained private.
Tess was all the more interested, as she stood listening behind, in finding that the preacher's doctrine was a vehement form of the view of Angel's father, and her interest intensified when the speaker began to detail his own spiritual experiences of how he had come by those views.
A warmly spiritual experience is achieved here, as the novel rushes toward a dawn that is both surprising and deeply emotional.
Ordinary spiritual experience: Qualitative research, interpretive guidelines, and population distribution for the daily spiritual experiences scale.
Kusht-Depdi is a colorful example of folk art that reflects the symbolic relation between historical and cultural traditions and spiritual experience of the nation, and represents the vivid example of harmonious blend of traditions of the past and creative energy of our time," the head of state noted.
Zachary Settle and Taylor Worley's collection of essays seeks to address this lacuna through the exploration of film-viewing as a spiritual experience, looking more closely at the meaning-filled relationship between the viewer and viewed through conversations on phenomenology and film.
Gonzalez' seascapes provide an array of seascapes where the waves, the wind and light create a dazzling vista, conveying both the ideals of the romantic and the awe and spiritual experience of the sublime.
The end goal of this research is to understand if some type of connection exists between the brain and spiritual experience," Daniel Cohen, co-author of the study and assistant professor of religious studies at the university, said in a (https://www.
How does the spiritual experience of women differ from that of men?
Seeing the Voice of God offers insights into night dreams and day visions and connects these to the science behind spiritual experience.
Primitive minds; evolution and spiritual experience in the Victorian novel.