Spithead


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Related to Spithead: The Nore

Spit·head

 (spĭt′hĕd′)
A channel off southern England between Portsmouth and the Isle of Wight. It connects with the Solent on the west and was formerly used as a rendezvous for the British fleet.

Spithead

(ˌspɪtˈhɛd)
n
(Placename) an extensive anchorage between the mainland of England and the Isle of Wight, off Portsmouth
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References in classic literature ?
Spithead, having entered the general's tent without being sent for, had drawn this question from Monk.
My lord," replied Spithead, "he told it me, but those devils of French names are so difficult to pronounce for a Scotch throat, that I could not retain it.
said Spithead, pointing to the fisherman, who, during this conversation, had remained standing and motionless, like a man who sees but does not understand.
Labour peer, Admiral Lord West of Spithead, said he was "deeply saddened" and very disappointed at the lack of mention of defence by the Chancellor, Philip Hammond.
Across: 1 Forest 4 Wagner 9 Gold 10 Coast 11 Rock 12 Nicole 13 Spithead 14 Palm Beach 16 Coal 17 Bude 18 Europeans 22 Distance 23 Kidman 25 Yale 26 Lathe 27 Lead 28 Damask 29 Espana
1782: The 100-ton battleship HMS Royal George sank off Spithead with the loss of more than 900 lives.
ON THIS DAY 1782: The 100-ton battleship HMS Royal George sank off Spithead with the loss of more than 900 lives.
Contractor address : Unit C5-7, Spithead Business Centre, Lake
Lord West of Spithead, a former First Sea Lord, told the Commons defence committee that further delays to long-awaited Type 26 frigates would leave the British Navy with a "grossly inadequate" fleet.
Lord West of Spithead, a former First Sea Lord, told the Commons' defence select committee the delay to the Type 26 frigate programme will leave the fleet "grossly inadequate" for the tasks ahead.
In a separate intervention, ex Royal Navy chief, Lord West of Spithead, said: "We need to be very certain of our ultimate aim and we don't seem to have great clarity of vision about what we are going to do there.
Built as an experimental vessel in 1894, and easily the fastest ship in the world at that time, Turbinia was demonstrated dramatically at the Spithead Navy Review in 1897 and set the standard for the next generation of steamships, the majority of which were turbine powered.