Sports


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sport

 (spôrt)
n.
1.
a. An activity involving physical exertion and skill that is governed by a set of rules or customs and often undertaken competitively.
b. often sports(used with a sing. verb) Such activities considered as a group: Sports is a good way for children to get exercise.
2.
a. A usually challenging activity undertaken for amusement: "the sport of trying to eat [a bratwurst] with anything fewer than four paper napkins" (Jane Kramer).
b. Fun; amusement: balanced on the curb just for the sport of it.
3.
a. Mockery; jest: He made sport of his own looks.
b. An object of mockery, jest, or play: treated our interests as sport.
c. A joking mood or attitude: She made the remark in sport.
4.
a. One known for the manner of one's acceptance of rules, especially of a game, or of a difficult situation: a poor sport.
b. Informal A fair-minded person, especially one who accepts teasing or difficult situations well: Be a sport and show me where you caught those fish.
c. Informal A pleasant companion: was a real sport during the trip.
5. Informal
a. A person who lives a jolly, extravagant life.
b. A gambler at sporting events.
6. Biology An organism or a part of an organism that shows a marked change from the parent type, typically as a result of mutation.
7. Obsolete Amorous dalliance; lovemaking.
v. sport·ed, sport·ing, sports
v.intr.
1. To play or frolic: children sporting in the waves.
2. To joke or trifle: "Lear ... in a storm, half mad, sported with by the gods" (Cynthia Ozick).
v.tr.
1. To wear or have on one's body, especially prominently or ostentatiously: sports diamond earrings; sports a tattoo.
2. To have as a prominent feature: a car sporting a new paint job.
adj. or sports
1. Of, relating to, or appropriate for sports: sport fishing; sports equipment.
2. Designed or appropriate for outdoor or informal wear: a sport shirt.

[Middle English sporte, short for disporte, from Old French desport, pleasure, from desporter, to divert; see disport.]

sport′ful adj.
sport′ful·ly adv.
sport′ful·ness n.

sports

(spɔːts)
n
1. (General Sporting Terms) (modifier) relating to, concerned with, or used in sports: sports equipment.
2. (Automotive Engineering) (modifier) relating to or similar to a sports car: sports seats.
3. (Education) Also called: sports day Brit a meeting held at a school or college for competitions in various athletic events

sport

(spɔrt, spoʊrt)

n.
1. an athletic activity requiring skill or physical prowess and often of a competitive nature.
2. such activities collectively.
3. diversion; recreation.
4. jest; pleasantry.
5. mockery; ridicule: They made sport of his haircut.
7. something tossed about like a plaything.
9. a person who behaves in a sportsmanlike, fair, or admirable manner.
10. a debonair person; bon vivant.
11. Biol. an organism or part that shows an unusual or singular deviation from the normal or parent type; mutation.
12. Obs. amorous dalliance.
adj.
13. of, pertaining to, or used in sports.
14. suitable for outdoor or informal wear: sport clothes.
v.i.
15. to amuse oneself with some pleasant pastime.
16. to frolic; gambol: kittens sporting and playing.
17. to engage in athletic activity.
18. to speak or act in jest.
19. to mock something.
20. Bot. to mutate.
v.t.
21. to wear or display, esp. with ostentation: sporting a new coat.
Also, sports .
[1350–1400; Middle English; aph. variant of disport]
sport′ful, adj.
sport′ful•ly, adv.
sport′ful•ness, n.

Sports

 

See Also: BASEBALL, BOXING AND WRESTLING, FOOTBALL, GOLF

  1. Batted the [tennis] ball away like an irritating gnat —Rita Mae Brown
  2. An American winning the French bicycle race is like a Frenchman winning most valuable baseball player —Chris Wallace commenting on Greg Le Mond’s winning of Tour De France race, NBC-TV, July 26, 1986
  3. Angling may be said to be so like the mathematics that it can never be fully learned —Izaak Walton
  4. The [tennis] ball knifes right onto the face of the strings and stays there like a piece of cheese —Ron Carlson
  5. Basketball is like poetry in motion —Jim Valvano, North Carolina State coach, 1987
  6. Bathers hop across the waves agilely, aimlessly, like fleas —Malcolm Cowley
  7. Coaching is like a monkey on a stick. You pass the same fellows on the way down as you pass on the way up —Steve Owen, New York Giants football coach
  8. [A swimmer] floated on her back [in water] like a pink air mattress —Will Weaver
  9. Having the America’s Cup yacht race in San Diego instead of Newport is like going to Mardi Gras in Pittsburgh —Rhode Island Representative St. Germaine, Wall Street Journal, February 5, 1987
  10. Hockey players are like mules. They have no fear of punishment and no hope of rewards —Emory Jones, general manager of the St. Louis Arena, St. Louis Post-Dispatch, December 26, 1963
  11. Holds a siren yellow tennis ball up in front of her, like the torch on the Statue of Liberty, and hits it with a combination of force and grace —Daphne Merkin
  12. If a tie is like kissing your sister, losing is like kissing your grandmother with her teeth out —George Brett, Cincinnati Royals third baseman, Sports Illustrated, June 23, 1986
  13. I saw more sails biting the wind than I’ve ever seen before; it was like sailing through the mouth of a shark —Jean Lamuniere, September 15, 1986
  14. Legs [bicycling] pumping like wheels —Murray Bail
  15. Little Pat played [tennis] … like a weekly wound up machine —John Updike
  16. Records fell like ripe apples on a windy day —E. B. White
  17. The reel was screaming … humming like a telegraph wire in a sixty-mile gale —Arthur Train
  18. The skaters [on the Ranger hockey team] … perform like an electrocardiogram readout —Craig Wolff, New York Times, September 8, 1986

    Wolffs simile alluded to the team’s impersonal performance.

  19. Sports is like a war without killing —Ted Turner, baseball team owner
  20. Swim like a cannonball —Tony Ardizzone
  21. (I can) swim like a duck —William Shakespeare
  22. Swimming the English Channel, it was like swimming in dishwater —Sandra Blewett, long distance swimmer, The Evening Standard, August 21, 1979
  23. Tearing through the water like a seal —Rosamond Lehmann
  24. Tennis is like a lawsuit; you can always be surprised by what happens on the other side of the court —Anon
  25. Their arms were so high on the follow-through it looked like a mass ascension of Mount Everest —Archie Oldham

    The simile, taken from a basketball story, The Zealots of Cranston Tech, describes a team of players all shooting for basket together.

  26. The undulant fly line coiled out over the pond like a fleeing serpent —Robert Traver
  27. Violent exercise is like a cold bath. You think it does you good because you feel better when you stop it —Robert Quillen
  28. (Bicycling children) wheeled like swallows through luminous, lemon-coloured air —Julia O’Faolain
  29. Working out the [fishing] line at his feet, like a cowboy coiling a rope —Robert Traver
  30. You will find angling to be like the virtue of humility, which has a calmness of spirit and a world of other blessings attending upon it —Izaak Walton
Translations
مُصَمَّم للرِّياضَه
sportovní
íòrótta-
športna stranšportni avtomobilšportni jopič

sports

, (US also) sport in cpdsSport-;
sports bar
n (esp US)Sportkneipe f (inf), → Kneipe fmit Sportübertragungen
sports bra
nSport-BH m
sports car
nSportwagen m
sportscast
nSportübertragung or -sendung f
sports centre, (US) sports center
nSportzentrum nt
sports commentator, (esp US) sportscaster
nSportreporter(in) m(f), → (Sport)kommentator(in) m(f)
sports coat
sports day
n (Brit) → (Schul)sportfest nt
sports department
nSportabteilung f
sports field, sports ground
n (Brit) → Sportplatz m
sports jacket
nSportjackett nt, → Sakko m or nt
sportsman
n (= player)Sportler m; (= hunter)Jäger m; sports of the yearSportler mdes Jahres
sportsmanlike
adjsportlich; (fig) behaviour, act etcfair
sportsmanship
n (= skill)Sportlichkeit f; (= fairness also)sportliches Verhalten, Fairness f
sports medicine
nSportmedizin f
sports page
nSportseite f
sportsperson
nSportler(in) m(f)
sports programme, (US) sports program
nSportprogramm nt
sports section
n (of newspaper)Sportteil m
sportswear
n (for sport) → Sportkleidung f; (= leisure wear)Freizeitkleidung f
sportswoman
nSportlerin f; sports of the yearSportlerin fdes Jahres
sports writer
nSportjournalist(in) m(f)

sport

(spoːt) noun
1. games or competitions involving physical activity. She's very keen on sport of all kinds.
2. a particular game or amusement of this kind. Hunting, shooting and fishing are not sports I enjoy.
3. a good-natured and obliging person. He's a good sport to agree to do that for us!
4. fun; amusement. I only did it for sport.
verb
to wear, especially in public. He was sporting a pink tie.
ˈsporting adjective
1. of, or concerned with, sports. the sporting world.
2. (negative unsporting) showing fairness and kindness or generosity, especially if unexpected. a sporting gesture.
sports adjective
(American also sport) designed, or suitable, for sport. a sports centre; sports equipment.
sports car
a small, fast car with only two seats.
sports jacket
a type of jacket for men, designed for casual wear.
ˈsportsman (ˈspoːts-) feminine ˈsportswoman noun
1. a person who takes part in sports. He is a very keen sportsman.
2. a person who shows a spirit of fairness and generosity in sport. He's a real sportsman who doesn't seem to care if he wins or loses.
ˈsportswear noun
clothing designed for playing sports in.
a sporting chance
a reasonably good chance.
Sports 
References in classic literature ?
The Good Sport was, so to speak, an outsize in Good Sports.
I guess, by all this quaint array, The burghers hold their sports to-day.
GRANDFATHER had been sitting in his old arm-chair all that pleasant afternoon, while the children were pursuing their various sports far off or near at hand, Sometimes you would have said, "Grandfather is asleep;" hut still, even when his eyes were closed, his thoughts were with the young people, playing among the flowers and shrubbery of the garden.
Low sports, such as prizefighting or Spanish bull-fights, are a sign of barbarity.
must not be dismissed discontented, for lack of their share in the sports.
So he at once said, "Aldermen and town councillors of the Phaeacians, we have had enough now, both of the feast, and of the minstrelsy that is its due accompaniment; let us proceed therefore to the athletic sports, so that our guest on his return home may be able to tell his friends how much we surpass all other nations as boxers, wrestlers, jumpers, and runners.
Authority on these points may be found in Strutt's Book of English Sports and Pastimes.
They quickly agreed to exchange the produce of their day's sport.
I don't know anything about it, except in a mixed-up, foggy way, Antonio, but I know enough to know it's grand sport.
Certainly to men of great judgment, bold persons are a sport to behold; nay, and to the vulgar also, boldness has somewhat of the ridiculous.
Come to Quito and I will show you the brave sport of men, the toreador and the bull.
At such times archery was always the main sport of the day, for the Nottinghamshire yeomen were the best hand at the longbow in all merry England, but this year the Sheriff hesitated a long time before he issued proclamation of the Fair, fearing lest Robin Hood and his band might come to it.