Stationers' Company


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Stationers' Company

n
(Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) a guild, established by Royal Charter from Queen Mary in 1557, composed of booksellers, printers, etc
References in periodicals archive ?
11) before finally alighting on the correct form, Stationers' Company (p.
Erne's positivism, Knight's poststructuralism, and Straznicky's storification of the Stationers' Company convey a knowing optimism about what the field David Kastan referred to as "the New Boredom" can accomplish.
The Stationers' Company and the Printers of London, 1501-1557.
When Tipper died unexpectedly in 1713, it was only right, then, that the Stationers' Company should turn to Beighton to succeed him.
The Stationers' Company, as a guild of publishers, did not have an interest in ensuring that legal deposit occurred.
One was The Ladies' Diary: or Woman's Almanac (edited by Charles Hutton), which had been published by the Stationers' Company annually since 1704 (and would continue until 1841).
Finally, the chapter on George Wither focuses on his account of writing as gradual, humble toil--"one line a day"--and his claim to own the fruits of his labor, in defiance of the Stationers' Company.
McKenzie began to collect references to the book trade that he discovered in the Calendar of State Papers, Domestic (CSPD), the Journals of the House of Commons and the House of Lords, and the Court Books of the Stationers' Company during the span 1641-1700.
Where earlier governments had relied on the system of the Stationers' Company Register to provide a basic framework for regulating the book trade, supplemented by prepublication licensing regulations and postpublication prosecution under the laws against sedition, libel, treason, and blasphemy, British governments in the eighteenth century, according to Greene, turned to a new system of control centered on a notion of authorial ownership of literary property.
AFTER FOXE'S DEATH the rights to the Acts and Monuments rested with the Stationers' Company and further editions, modestly updated mainly with French material, appeared in 1596 and 1610.
With 4,295 pieces of music listed in the book during the period 1710-1810, and an additional 1,164 from 1811-1818 that are given briefer attention, we have a clear idea of what was registered and can see that on average music publications were about 25 percent of all registrations with the Stationers' Company.