steak

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steak

 (stāk)
n.
1. A slice of meat, typically beef, usually cut thick and across the muscle grain and served broiled or fried.
2. A thick slice of a large fish cut across the body.
3. A patty of ground meat broiled or fried.

[Middle English steike, from Old Norse steik; see steig- in Indo-European roots.]

steak

(steɪk)
n
1. (Cookery) See beefsteak
2. (Cookery) any of various cuts of beef of varying quality, used for braising, stewing, etc
3. (Cookery) a thick slice of pork, veal, etc, or of a large fish, esp cod or salmon
4. (Cookery) minced meat prepared in the same way as steak: hamburger steak.
[C15: from Old Norse steik roast; related to steikja to roast on a spit; see stick1]

steak

(steɪk)

n.
a slice of meat or fish, esp. beef, cooked by broiling, frying, or the like.
[1400–50; < Old Norse steik meat roasted on a spit]

steak

- Seems to be related to Old Norse steikja, "roast on a spit," and stikna, "be roasted."
See also related terms for roast.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.steak - a slice of meat cut from the fleshy part of an animal or large fishsteak - a slice of meat cut from the fleshy part of an animal or large fish
cut of meat, cut - a piece of meat that has been cut from an animal carcass
fish steak - cross-section slice of a large fish
beefsteak - a beef steak usually cooked by broiling
Translations
biftekfiléřízek
bøf=-bøf
pihvi
odrezak
hússzelet
kjötsneiî eîa fiskstykki til steikingar
ステーキ
스테이크
žuvies gabalas
gaļas/zivs gabals
mihnúť sa
zrezek
biffstek
เนื้อสเต็ก
miếng thịt bò nạc

steak

[steɪk]
A. N (= one piece) → filete m or bistec m de vaca, filete m or bistec m de res (LAm), bife m (Andes, S. Cone); (for stewing etc) → carne f de vaca or res; (= barbecued steak) → churrasco m (And, S. Cone)
B. CPD steak and kidney pie Npastel m de carne y riñones
steak house Nasador m
steak knife Ncuchillo m para la carne

steak

[ˈsteɪk] n
(= meat) → bifteck m, steak m
steak and chips → un steak frites
(= fish) → steak m
tuna steak → steak de thonsteak and kidney pie ntourte f à la viande de bœuf et aux rognonssteak and kidney pudding npudding m à la viande de bœuf et aux rognonssteak house steakhouse [ˈsteɪkhaʊs] ngrill-room msteak knife n [steak knives] (pl) → couteau m à viande

steak

nSteak nt; (of fish)Filet nt; a ham/bacon steakeine Scheibe gebackener Schinken/Speck; steak and kidney pieFleischpastete fmit Nieren; steak dinnerSteakmenü nt

steak

:
steakhouse
nSteakhouse nt
steak knife
nSteakmesser nt
steak tartare
nTatarbeefsteak nt

steak

[steɪk] n (beef) → carne f di manzo; (piece of beef, pork) → bistecca
a cod steak → un trancio di merluzzo
steak and kidney pie pasticcio di carne e rognoni di manzo in pasta sfoglia

steak

(steik) noun
a slice of meat (usually beef) or fish (often cod) for eg frying or stewing. a piece of steak; two cod steaks.

steak

شَرِيحَةُ لَـحْم biftek bøf Steak μπριζόλα bistec pihvi steak odrezak bistecca ステーキ 스테이크 biefstuk biff befsztyk bife бифштекс biff เนื้อสเต็ก biftek miếng thịt bò nạc 牛排

steak

n bistec m
References in classic literature ?
It may be as you say," he continued, reverting to the purport of Heyward's last remark; "and the greater the reason why we should cut our steaks, and let the carcass drive down the stream, or we shall have the pack howling along the cliffs, begrudging every mouthful we swallow.
He never eats dumplings, he don't--he eats nothing but steaks, and likes 'em rare.
There were a good many cattle butchers about just then, with nothing much to do, and hungry children at home; and so some one had knocked out the steer--and as a first-class man can kill and dress one in a couple of minutes, there were a good many steaks and roasts already missing.
and I have often wishedbut it is so little one can venture to dosmall, trifling presents, of any thing uncommon Now we have killed a porker, and Emma thinks of sending them a loin or a leg; it is very small and delicateHartfield pork is not like any other porkbut still it is porkand, my dear Emma, unless one could be sure of their making it into steaks, nicely fried, as ours are fried, without the smallest grease, and not roast it, for no stomach can bear roast porkI think we had better send the leg do not you think so, my dear?
When Herbert came, we went and had lunch at a celebrated house which I then quite venerated, but now believe to have been the most abject superstition in Europe, and where I could not help noticing, even then, that there was much more gravy on the tablecloths and knives and waiters' clothes, than in the steaks.
On this trip I tasted the first meat I had eaten since leaving Earth--large, juicy steaks and chops from the well-fed domestic animals of the farms.
Tortoise liver, filleted shark, and beef steaks from seadogs.
They set the steaks to grill and made an excellent dinner, after which the inspired bard, Demodocus, who was a favourite with every one, sang to them; but Ulysses kept on turning his eyes towards the sun, as though to hasten his setting, for he was longing to be on his way.
She did her best in the way of flogging him while an infant -- for duties to her well -- regulated mind were always pleasures, and babies, like tough steaks, or the modern Greek olive trees, are invariably the better for beating -- but, poor woman
The practiced knights from Palestine made holyday sport of carving the awkward men-at- arms into chops and steaks.
Joe had cut some of the nicest steaks and the best parts of the tenderloin from the carcass of the antelope, and these were quickly transformed to the most savory of broils.
By the time the "scherm" was finished the moon peeped up, and our dinners of giraffe steaks and roasted marrow-bones were ready.