steam engine

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steam engine

n.
An engine that converts the heat energy of pressurized steam into mechanical energy, especially one in which steam drives a piston in a closed cylinder.

steam′ en`gine


n.
an engine worked by steam, typically one in which a sliding piston in a cylinder is moved by the expansive action of the steam generated in a boiler.
[1745–55]

steam engine

An engine in which the energy of hot steam is converted into mechanical power, especially an engine in which the steam expands in a closed cylinder and drives a piston.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.steam engine - external-combustion engine in which heat is used to raise steam which either turns a turbine or forces a piston to move up and down in a cylindersteam engine - external-combustion engine in which heat is used to raise steam which either turns a turbine or forces a piston to move up and down in a cylinder
boiler, steam boiler - sealed vessel where water is converted to steam
crosshead - metal block that connects to a piston; it slides on parallel guides and moves a connecting rod back and forth
external-combustion engine - a heat engine in which ignition occurs outside the chamber (cylinder or turbine) in which heat is converted to mechanical energy
steam chest - the chamber from which steam is distributed to a cylinder
steamship, steamer - a ship powered by one or more steam engines
steam locomotive - a locomotive powered by a steam engine
Translations
مُحَرِّك بُخاري
parní lokomotivaparní strojparostroj
damplokomotiv
höyrykonemäntähöyrykone
locomotive à vapeurmachine à vapeur
parni strojparostroj
gõzgépgõzmozdony
gufuvél
máquina a vapor
parný stroj
ångmaskin
buharlı lokomotif

steam engine

n (Rail) → locomotiva a vapore

steam

(stiːm) noun
1. a gas or vapour that rises from hot or boiling water or other liquid. Steam rose from the plate of soup / the wet earth in the hot sun; a cloud of steam; (also adjective) A sauna is a type of steam bath.
2. power or energy obtained from this. The machinery is driven by steam; Diesel fuel has replaced steam on the railways; (also adjective) steam power, steam engines.
verb
1. to give out steam. A kettle was steaming on the stove.
2. (of a ship, train etc) to move by means of steam. The ship steamed across the bay.
3. to cook by steam. The pudding should be steamed for four hours.
steam-
steam-driven / steam-powered machinery.
ˈsteamer noun
a steamboat or steamship.
ˈsteamy adjective
of, or full of, steam. the steamy atmosphere of the laundry.
ˈsteamboat, ˈsteamship nouns
a ship driven by steam.
steam engine
a moving engine for pulling a train, or a fixed engine, driven by steam.
steam roller
a type of vehicle driven by steam, with wide and heavy wheels for flattening the surface of newly-made roads etc.
full steam ahead
at the greatest speed possible.
get steamed up
to get very upset or angry.
get up steam
to build up energy ready for effort.
let off steam
1. to release steam into the air.
2. to release or get rid of excess energy, emotion etc. The children were letting off steam by running about in the playground.
run out of steam
to lose energy, or become exhausted.
steam up
to (cause to) become covered with steam. The windows steamed up / became steamed up.
under one's own steam
by one's own efforts, without help from others. John gave me a lift in his car, but Mary arrived under her own steam.
References in classic literature ?
Because of their steam propulsion, the American ships were larger and with a more graceful outline.
The aim of fowler~s rebuilding is to stop its decades of degradation, Restore it to a historically faithful form, And bring it into a fully functional state so as to display as a living exhibit a major milestone in the development of agricultural technology that was the introduction of steam propulsion.
Though this worked well enough in the age of sail and solid shot, steam propulsion, iron hulls, and exploding shot reversed the calculus, leaving Southern coastal defenses vulnerable.
Steam propulsion may be a technology from a bygone era but it still brings pleasure to thousands.
The adoption of a reheating cycle, a field in which the company has a strong track record in onshore commercial power generation plants, results in a near 15% improvement in fuel efficiency compared to conventional steam propulsion plants, making MHI USTs more economical and environmentally compatible.
The author then traces back to the early rise of steam propulsion in the United States and Moses Rogers's story from his birth in New London, Connecticut, through his career as a pioneer steamboat captain on the Hudson River, then as steamship designer and founder of the Savannah Steamship Company.
The design of the boats became more sophisticated, steam propulsion improved and the boats became longer to give improved accuracy.