Smith

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smith

 (smĭth)
n.
1. A metalworker, especially one who works metal when it is hot and malleable. Often used in combination: a silversmith; a goldsmith.
2. A blacksmith.
3. One who makes or works at something specified. Often used in combination: a locksmith; a wordsmith.

[Middle English, from Old English.]

smith

(smɪθ)
n
1. (Metallurgy)
a. a person who works in metal, esp one who shapes metal by hammering
b. (in combination): a silversmith.
2. (Metallurgy) See blacksmith
[Old English; related to Old Norse smithr, Old High German smid, Middle Low German smīde jewellery, Greek smilē carving knife]

Smith

(smɪθ)
n
1. (Biography) Adam. 1723–90, Scottish economist and philosopher, whose influential book The Wealth of Nations (1776) advocated free trade and private enterprise and opposed state interference
2. (Biography) Alexander McCall. born 1948, Scottish writer and academic, born in Zimbabwe. His novels include The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency (1998), The Sunday Philosophy Club (2004) and 44 Scotland Street (2005)
3. (Biography) Bessie, known as Empress of the Blues. 1894–1937, US blues singer and songwriter
4. (Biography) Delia. born 1941, British cookery writer and broadcaster: her publications include The Complete Cookery Course (1982)
5. (Biography) F.E. See (1st Earl of) Birkenhead2
6. (Biography) Ian (Douglas). 1919–2007, Zimbabwean statesman; prime minister of Rhodesia (1964–79). He declared independence from Britain unilaterally (1965)
7. (Biography) John. ?1580–1631, English explorer and writer, who helped found the North American colony of Jamestown, Virginia. He was reputedly saved by the Indian chief's daughter Pocahontas from execution by her tribe. Among his works is a Description of New England (1616)
8. (Biography) John. 1938–94, British Labour politician; leader of the Labour Party 1992–94
9. (Biography) Joseph. 1805–44, US religious leader; founder of the Mormon Church
10. (Biography) Dame Maggie. born 1934, British actress. She has appeared in the films The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie (1969), California Suite (1978), The Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne (1988), The Secret Garden (1993), Gosford Park (2001), the Harry Potter series (2001–11), and in the TV series Downton Abbey (from 2010)
11. (Biography) Stevie, real name Florence Margaret Smith. 1902–71, British poet. Her works include Novel on Yellow Paper (1936), and the poems 'A Good Time was had by All' (1937) and 'Not Waving but Drowning' (1957)
12. (Biography) Sydney. 1771–1845, British clergyman and writer, noted for The Letters of Peter Plymley (1807–08), in which he advocated Catholic emancipation
13. (Biography) Will(ard Christopher). born 1968, US film actor and rap singer; star of the television series The Fresh Prince of Bel Air (1990–96), the Men In Black series of films (1997–2012), Ali (2001), and I Robot (2004)
14. (Biography) Wilbur. born 1933, British novelist, born in Zambia. His novels include Where the Lion Feeds (1964), Monsoon (1999) and The Quest (2007)
15. (Biography) William. 1769–1839, English geologist, who founded the science of stratigraphy by proving that rock strata could be dated by the fossils they contained

smith

(smɪθ)

n.
1. a worker in metal.
[before 900; Middle English, Old English, c. Old Frisian smith, Old High German smid, Old Norse smithr, Gothic -smitha]

Smith

(smɪθ)

n.
1. Adam, 1723–90, Scottish economist.
2. Alfred E(manuel), 1873–1944, U.S. political leader.
3. Bessie, 1894?–1937, U.S. singer.
4. Betty W(ehner), 1904–72, U.S. novelist and playwright.
5. David, 1906–65, U.S. sculptor.
6. Edmond Kirby, 1824–93, Confederate general in the Civil War.
7. John, 1580–1631, English adventurer and colonist in Virginia.
8. Joseph, 1805–44, U.S. religious leader: founded the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.
9. Leon Polk, born 1906, U.S. painter.
10. Lillian, 1897?–1966, U.S. writer and civil-rights activist.
11. Margaret Chase, 1897–1995, U.S. politician.
12. Stevie, 1902?–71, English poet.
13. Sydney, 1771–1845, English clergyman, writer, and wit.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Smith - Rhodesian statesman who declared independence of Zimbabwe from Great Britain (born in 1919)
2.smith - United States sculptor (1906-1965)Smith - United States sculptor (1906-1965)  
3.Smith - United States singer noted for her rendition of patriotic songs (1909-1986)
4.Smith - United States suffragist who refused to pay taxes until she could vote (1792-1886)
5.Smith - United States blues singer (1894-1937)
6.smith - religious leader who founded the Mormon Church in 1830 (1805-1844)Smith - religious leader who founded the Mormon Church in 1830 (1805-1844)
7.smith - English explorer who helped found the colony at Jamestown, VirginiaSmith - English explorer who helped found the colony at Jamestown, Virginia; was said to have been saved by Pocahontas (1580-1631)
8.smith - Scottish economist who advocated private enterprise and free trade (1723-1790)Smith - Scottish economist who advocated private enterprise and free trade (1723-1790)
9.smith - someone who works at something specified
arrowsmith - a maker of arrows
gunsmith - someone who makes or repairs guns
locksmith - someone who makes or repairs locks
skilled worker, skilled workman, trained worker - a worker who has acquired special skills
tinner, tinsmith - someone who makes or repairs tinware
10.smith - someone who works metal (especially by hammering it when it is hot and malleable)smith - someone who works metal (especially by hammering it when it is hot and malleable)
blacksmith - a smith who forges and shapes iron with a hammer and anvil
forger - someone who operates a forge
skilled worker, skilled workman, trained worker - a worker who has acquired special skills
Translations
حَدّادعامِل طَرْق المَعادِن
kovářkovotepeczlatník
grovsmedsmed
SchmidtSchmiedSchmittSchmid
seppä
kovačkovačica
kovácsfegyverkovácsfémmûves
e-r sem fæst viî málmsmíîarjárnsmiîur
kalvė-kalys
ieroču kalējskalējssudrabkaliszeltkalis
kovač
kovač
smed
demircimaden zanaatkârınalbant
коваль
…匠锻工

smith

[smɪθ] Nherrero/a m/f

smith

[ˈsmɪθ] n (also blacksmith) → forgeron m

smith

nSchmied(in) m(f)

smith

[smɪθ] nfabbro

smith

(smiθ) noun
1. a blacksmith.
2. a person whose job is to work with a particular metal, or make a particular type of article. a goldsmith; a silversmith; a gunsmith.
smithy (smiði) , (-θi) noun
the workshop of a blacksmith.
References in periodicals archive ?
A Stevie Smith B Stevie Jones C Stevie Black D Stevie Mathews 12.
STEVIE SMITH is backing Lee McCulloch to turn Kilmarnock's talented kids into serial winners.
Andy Halliday doubled the lead from the spot after Stevie Smith tripped Jason Holt in the box, with Joe Garner's tap-in rounding off victory after the interval.
Stevie Smith is baffled as to why Kilmarnock failed to turn up at Ross County last week only to excel against Rangers on Friday.
STEVIE SMITH has revealed Kilmarnock boss Lee Clark was so unconcerned by stories surrounding his Rugby Park future that he did not even bother addressing his players on the subject.
Novel on Yellow Paper by Stevie Smith (Jonathan Cape, 1936) In my early teens, I outgrew the Glebe library and began buying paperbacks in a small bookshop in a nearby town.
Past recipients of the Gold Medal include WH Auden (1936), John Betjeman (1960), Philip Larkin (1965), Stevie Smith (1969) and Ted Hughes (1974).
But it wasn't the fluidity with which Stevie Smith moved from one poetic mode to another that astonished me, but the fact that this constant shifting always suggested a brain behind the poem at work on a problem, a speaker of two (or three or four) minds who had not yet decided how she felt--and communicated that indecision (and complexity) not just through the literal meaning of her words, but through the temporary, unsettling music that accompanied them.
Thomas and Welsh poetry; Stevie Smith, Sylvia Plath and Jo Shapcott; Ted Hughes and Geoffrey Hill; poetry by West Indians living in the UK; Tony Harrison, Peter Reading, Ken Smith, Sean O'Brien; Edwin Morgan, Douglas Dunn, Liz Lochhead, Robert Crawford, Don Patterson, and Kathleen Jamie; and finally, James Fenton, Craig Raine, Christopher Reid, Simon Armitage, and Carol Ann Duffy.
TWO decades in the life of the poet Stevie Smith are told in a torrent of words.
Particularly enjoyable - paradoxically, considering the subject matter - was Robin Holloway's unaccompanied cycle Five Little Songs about Death, which Moore sang superbly well, colouring the mood of each song (words by Stevie Smith, never a bundle of laughs) with intense emotional power.