stimulate


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stim·u·late

 (stĭm′yə-lāt′)
v. stim·u·lat·ed, stim·u·lat·ing, stim·u·lates
v.tr.
1. To rouse to action or increased activity; excite: a policy that stimulated people to protest; incentives to stimulate consumer spending. See Synonyms at provoke.
2. To increase temporarily the activity of (a body organ or system, for example).
3. To cause to be interested or engaged: Animals in zoos need to be stimulated to remain healthy.
4. To cause to desire to have sex; arouse sexually.
5. To excite or invigorate (a person, for example) with a stimulant.
v.intr.
To act or serve as a stimulant or stimulus.

[Latin stimulāre, stimulāt-, to goad on, from stimulus, goad.]

stim′u·lat′er, stim′u·la′tor n.
stim′u·lat′ing·ly adv.
stim′u·la′tion n.
stim′u·la′tive, stim′u·la·to′ry (-lə-tôr′ē) adj.

stimulate

(ˈstɪmjʊˌleɪt)
vb
1. (tr; usually passive) to fill (a person) with ideas or enthusiasm: he was stimulated by the challenge.
2. (Physiology) (tr) physiol to excite (a nerve, organ, etc) with a stimulus
3. to encourage (something) to start or progress further: a cut in interest rates should help stimulate economic recovery.
[C16: from Latin stimulāre; see stimulant]
ˈstimulable adj
ˌstimuˈlation n
ˈstimulative, ˈstimulatory adj, n
ˈstimuˌlator, ˈstimuˌlater n

stim•u•late

(ˈstɪm yəˌleɪt)

v. -lat•ed, -lat•ing. v.t.
1. to rouse to action or effort, as by encouragement or pressure; incite.
2. to excite (a nerve, gland, etc.) to its functional activity.
3. to invigorate (a person) by a food or beverage containing a stimulant.
v.i.
4. to act as a stimulus or stimulant.
[1540–50; < Latin stimulātus, past participle of stimulāre to goad. See stimulus, -ate1]
stim′u•la•ble, adj.
stim`u•la•bil′i•ty, n.
stim`u•la′tion, n.
stim′u•la`tor, n.

stimulate

  • aperitif, appetizer - An aperitif is a drink to stimulate the appetite and an appetizer is a food that does this before a meal.
  • condiment - From Latin condimentum, from condire, "to pickle, preserve"; condiments are food substances used to heighten the natural flavor of foods, to stimulate the appetite, to aid digestion, or preserve certain foods.
  • innervate, enervate - Innervate means "to stimulate or give nervous energy," the opposite of enervate.
  • stimulate - From Latin stimulus, "pointed stick for goading animals."

stimulate


Past participle: stimulated
Gerund: stimulating

Imperative
stimulate
stimulate
Present
I stimulate
you stimulate
he/she/it stimulates
we stimulate
you stimulate
they stimulate
Preterite
I stimulated
you stimulated
he/she/it stimulated
we stimulated
you stimulated
they stimulated
Present Continuous
I am stimulating
you are stimulating
he/she/it is stimulating
we are stimulating
you are stimulating
they are stimulating
Present Perfect
I have stimulated
you have stimulated
he/she/it has stimulated
we have stimulated
you have stimulated
they have stimulated
Past Continuous
I was stimulating
you were stimulating
he/she/it was stimulating
we were stimulating
you were stimulating
they were stimulating
Past Perfect
I had stimulated
you had stimulated
he/she/it had stimulated
we had stimulated
you had stimulated
they had stimulated
Future
I will stimulate
you will stimulate
he/she/it will stimulate
we will stimulate
you will stimulate
they will stimulate
Future Perfect
I will have stimulated
you will have stimulated
he/she/it will have stimulated
we will have stimulated
you will have stimulated
they will have stimulated
Future Continuous
I will be stimulating
you will be stimulating
he/she/it will be stimulating
we will be stimulating
you will be stimulating
they will be stimulating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been stimulating
you have been stimulating
he/she/it has been stimulating
we have been stimulating
you have been stimulating
they have been stimulating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been stimulating
you will have been stimulating
he/she/it will have been stimulating
we will have been stimulating
you will have been stimulating
they will have been stimulating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been stimulating
you had been stimulating
he/she/it had been stimulating
we had been stimulating
you had been stimulating
they had been stimulating
Conditional
I would stimulate
you would stimulate
he/she/it would stimulate
we would stimulate
you would stimulate
they would stimulate
Past Conditional
I would have stimulated
you would have stimulated
he/she/it would have stimulated
we would have stimulated
you would have stimulated
they would have stimulated
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.stimulate - act as a stimulant; "The book stimulated her imagination"; "This play stimulates"
affect, bear upon, impact, bear on, touch on, touch - have an effect upon; "Will the new rules affect me?"
invigorate, quicken - give life or energy to; "The cold water invigorated him"
innervate - stimulate to action; "innervate a muscle or a nerve"
irritate - excite to some characteristic action or condition, such as motion, contraction, or nervous impulse, by the application of a stimulus; "irritate the glands of a leaf"
dampen, stifle - smother or suppress; "Stifle your curiosity"
2.stimulate - cause to do; cause to act in a specified manner; "The ads induced me to buy a VCR"; "My children finally got me to buy a computer"; "My wife made me buy a new sofa"
decide - cause to decide; "This new development finally decided me!"
persuade - cause somebody to adopt a certain position, belief, or course of action; twist somebody's arm; "You can't persuade me to buy this ugly vase!"
bring - induce or persuade; "The confession of one of the accused brought the others to admit to the crime as well"
solicit - incite, move, or persuade to some act of lawlessness or insubordination; "He was accused of soliciting his colleagues to destroy the documents"
encourage - spur on; "His financial success encouraged him to look for a wife"
let - actively cause something to happen; "I let it be known that I was not interested"
lead - cause to undertake a certain action; "Her greed led her to forge the checks"
instigate, prompt, inspire - serve as the inciting cause of; "She prompted me to call my relatives"
suborn - induce to commit perjury or give false testimony; "The President tried to suborn false witnesses"
compel, obligate, oblige - force somebody to do something; "We compel all students to fill out this form"
3.stimulate - stir the feelings, emotions, or peace of; "These stories shook the community"; "the civil war shook the country"
arouse, elicit, evoke, provoke, enkindle, kindle, fire, raise - call forth (emotions, feelings, and responses); "arouse pity"; "raise a smile"; "evoke sympathy"
fuel - stimulate; "fuel the debate on creationism"
sex, wind up, excite, turn on, arouse - stimulate sexually; "This movie usually arouses the male audience"
affright, fright, frighten, scare - cause fear in; "The stranger who hangs around the building frightens me"; "Ghosts could never affright her"
thrill, tickle, vibrate - feel sudden intense sensation or emotion; "he was thrilled by the speed and the roar of the engine"
invite, tempt - give rise to a desire by being attractive or inviting; "the window displays tempted the shoppers"
elate, intoxicate, uplift, lift up, pick up - fill with high spirits; fill with optimism; "Music can uplift your spirits"
animate, enliven, inspire, invigorate, exalt - heighten or intensify; "These paintings exalt the imagination"
titillate - excite pleasurably or erotically; "A titillating story appeared in the usually conservative magazine"
4.stimulate - cause to be alert and energeticstimulate - cause to be alert and energetic; "Coffee and tea stimulate me"; "This herbal infusion doesn't stimulate"
affect - act physically on; have an effect upon; "the medicine affects my heart rate"
cathect - inject with libidinal energy
reanimate, recreate, revivify, vivify, revive, renovate, animate, quicken, repair - give new life or energy to; "A hot soup will revive me"; "This will renovate my spirits"; "This treatment repaired my health"
reinvigorate, invigorate - impart vigor, strength, or vitality to; "Exercise is invigorating"
liven, liven up, enliven, invigorate, animate - make lively; "let's liven up this room a bit"
sedate, tranquilize, tranquillise, tranquillize, calm - cause to be calm or quiet as by administering a sedative to; "The patient must be sedated before the operation"
5.stimulate - cause to occur rapidly; "the infection precipitated a high fever and allergic reactions"
effect, effectuate, set up - produce; "The scientists set up a shock wave"
6.stimulate - stir feelings in; "stimulate my appetite"; "excite the audience"; "stir emotions"
jack off, jerk off, she-bop, wank, masturbate, fuck off - get sexual gratification through self-stimulation
masturbate - stimulate sexually; "The old man wanted to be masturbated by the prostitute"
sensitise, sensitize - cause to sense; make sensitive; "She sensitized me with respect to gender differences in this traditional male-dominated society"; "My tongue became sensitized to good wine"
horripilate - cause (someone's) hair to stand on end and to have goosebumps; "Hitchcock movies horripilate me"
work - provoke or excite; "The rock musician worked the crowd of young girls into a frenzy"
fellate, go down on, suck, blow - provide sexual gratification through oral stimulation
thrill - cause to be thrilled by some perceptual input; "The men were thrilled by a loud whistle blow"
whet, quicken - make keen or more acute; "whet my appetite"
disgust, gross out, revolt, repel - fill with distaste; "This spoilt food disgusts me"
7.stimulate - provide the needed stimulus for
entice, lure, tempt - provoke someone to do something through (often false or exaggerated) promises or persuasion; "He lured me into temptation"
rejuvenate - cause (a stream or river) to erode, as by an uplift of the land
jog - stimulate to remember; "jog my memory"
instigate, incite, stir up, set off - provoke or stir up; "incite a riot"; "set off great unrest among the people"
challenge - issue a challenge to; "Fischer challenged Spassky to a match"
agitate, foment, stir up - try to stir up public opinion

stimulate

verb encourage, inspire, prompt, fire, fan, urge, spur, provoke, turn on (slang), arouse, animate, rouse, prod, quicken, inflame, incite, instigate, goad, whet, impel, foment, gee up I was stimulated to examine my deepest thoughts.

stimulate

verb
2. To give or impart vitality and energy to (someone or something):
Translations
يُثير، يُحَفِّز
povzbudit
opmuntrestimulere
hvetja, örva
labai įdomuspaskatinimasstimuliavimasstimuliuoti
just stimulustimulēt

stimulate

[ˈstɪmjʊleɪt] VTestimular; [+ growth etc] → favorecer; [+ demand] → estimular
to stimulate sb to do sthalentar a algn a que haga algo

stimulate

[ˈstɪmjʊleɪt] vt
(= encourage) [+ interest, discussion, demand, economy] → stimuler
(= make interested) [+ person] → stimuler
(PHYSIOLOGY)stimuler

stimulate

vt
(= excite) body, circulation, mindanregen; (cold shower, coffee etc) sbbeleben; (Med) → stimulieren; nervereizen; (sexually) → erregen, stimulieren; (fig) personanimieren, anspornen; (mentally, intellectually) → stimulieren; sb’s interesterregen; to stimulate somebody to do somethingjdn anspornen or dazu animieren, etw zu tun; to stimulate somebody into activityjdn aktiv werden lassen
(= increase) economy, sales etcankurbeln; growth, production, marketstimulieren; (= incite) responsehervorrufen; criticismanregen zu; to stimulate investmentsInvestitionen anlocken

stimulate

[ˈstɪmjʊˌleɪt] vtstimolare
to stimulate sb to do sth → stimolare qn a fare qc

stimulate

(ˈstimjuleit) verb
to rouse or make more alert, active etc. After listening to the violin concerto, he felt stimulated to practise the violin again.
ˌstimuˈlation noun
ˈstimulating adjective
rousing; very interesting. a stimulating discussion.

stimulate

v. estimular; motivar; excitar; stimulated;
a. estimulado-a.

stimulate

vt estimular
References in classic literature ?
Pleasurable sensations either stimulate no action at all, or at most stimulate such action as is likely to prolong them.
Pleasure" is a property of a sensation or other mental occurrence, consisting in the fact that the occurrence in question either does not stimulate any voluntary or reflex movement, or, if it does, stimulates only such as tend to prolong the occurrence in question.
Discomfort" is a property of a sensation or other mental occurrence, consisting in the fact that the occurrence in question stimulates voluntary or reflex movements tending to produce some more or less definite change involving the cessation of the occurrence.
In this depressed state of the classical market, Mrs Jarley made extraordinary efforts to stimulate the popular taste, and whet the popular curiosity.
Mournfully and low the man of God began his eulogy of the dead, and his doleful voice, mingled with the sobbing which it was its purpose to stimulate and sustain, rose and fell, seemed to come and go, like the sound of a sullen sea.
According to his plan, it was to be distributed in immense quantities immediately, in order to stimulate and generate, "to generate and stimulate," he repeated, "right thoughts in the country before the meeting of Parliament.
The same pride of family that had, by its self-satisfied indolence, conduced to aid their fail, now became a principle to stimulate them to endeavor to rise again.
Very likely," says the doctor: "I have known people eat in a fever; and it is very easily accounted for; because the acidity occasioned by the febrile matter may stimulate the nerves of the diaphragm, and thereby occasion a craving which will not be easily distinguishable from a natural appetite; but the aliment will not be concreted, nor assimilated into chyle, and so will corrode the vascular orifices, and thus will aggravate the febrific symptoms.
Emporiums of splendid dresses, the materials brought from every quarter of the world; tempting stores of everything to stimulate and pamper the sated appetite and give new relish to the oft-repeated feast; vessels of burnished gold and silver, wrought into every exquisite form of vase, and dish, and goblet; guns, swords, pistols, and patent engines of destruction; screws and irons for the crooked, clothes for the newly-born, drugs for the sick, coffins for the dead, and churchyards for the buried-- all these jumbled each with the other and flocking side by side, seemed to flit by in motley dance like the fantastic groups of the old Dutch painter, and with the same stern moral for the unheeding restless crowd.
The Chevalier de Lorraine, who had no occasion to speculate about anything, inasmuch as he knew all, ate his breakfast with that extraordinary appetite which the troubles of one's friends but stimulates, and enjoyed at the same time both Monsieur's ill-humor and the vexation of Manicamp.
A princess who is tinged with coquetry usually forms a brilliant court around her; her smile stimulates luxury, arouses wit, and even courage; the nobles, too, fight better for a prince whose wife is beautiful.
Other proteins, broadly known as neurotrophic factors, stimulate some axon growth.