stoic


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sto·ic

 (stō′ĭk)
n.
1. One who is seemingly indifferent to or unaffected by joy, grief, pleasure, or pain.
2. Stoic A member of an originally Greek school of philosophy, founded by Zeno of Citium about 308 bc, believing that God determined everything for the best and that virtue is sufficient for happiness. Its later Roman form advocated the calm acceptance of all occurrences as the unavoidable result of divine will or of the natural order.
adj. also sto·i·cal (-ĭ-kəl)
1. Seemingly indifferent to or unaffected by pleasure or pain; impassive: "stoic resignation in the face of hunger" (John F. Kennedy).
2. Stoic Of or relating to the Stoics or their philosophy.

[Middle English Stoic, a Stoic, from Latin Stōicus, from Greek Stōikos, from stoā (poikilē), (Painted) Porch, where Zeno taught; see stā- in Indo-European roots.]

sto′i·cal·ly adv.
sto′i·cal·ness n.

Stoic

(ˈstəʊɪk)
n
(Philosophy) a member of the ancient Greek school of philosophy founded by Zeno of Citium, holding that virtue and happiness can be attained only by submission to destiny and the natural law
adj
(Philosophy) of or relating to the doctrines of the Stoics
[C16: via Latin from Greek stōikos, from stoa the porch in Athens where Zeno taught]

stoic

(ˈstəʊɪk)
n
a person who maintains stoical qualities
adj
a variant of stoical

Sto•ic

(ˈstoʊ ɪk)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to the school of philosophy founded by Zeno, who taught that people should be free from passion, unmoved by joy or grief, and submit without complaint to unavoidable necessity.
2. (l.c.) stoical.
n.
3. a member or adherent of the Stoic school of philosophy.
4. (l.c.) a person who maintains or affects the mental attitude advocated by the Stoics.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin Stōicus < Greek Stōïkós, derivative of stoá stoa, the portico at Athens where Zeno taught]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stoic - a member of the ancient Greek school of philosophy founded by ZenoStoic - a member of the ancient Greek school of philosophy founded by Zeno; "a Stoic achieves happiness by submission to destiny"
philosopher - a specialist in philosophy
2.stoic - someone who is seemingly indifferent to emotionsstoic - someone who is seemingly indifferent to emotions
adult, grownup - a fully developed person from maturity onward
Adj.1.stoic - seeming unaffected by pleasure or pain; impassive; "stoic courage"; "stoic patience"; "a stoical sufferer"
unemotional - unsusceptible to or destitute of or showing no emotion
2.Stoic - pertaining to Stoicism or its followers
Translations
szenvedélymentessztoikus

stoic

[ˈstəʊɪk]
A. ADJestoico
B. Nestoico m

stoic

[ˈstəʊɪk] nstoïque mf

Stoic

(Philos)
nStoiker m
adjstoisch

stoic

nStoiker(in) m(f)
adjstoisch

stoic

[ˈstəʊɪk] nstoico/a

stoic

adj (referring to patients) con alta tolerancia al dolor, que no se queja mucho
References in classic literature ?
The sternest- seeming stoic is human after all; and to "burst" with boldness and good-will into "the silent sea" of their souls is often to confer on them the first of obligations.
In trooped the motley organization-- black slaves and dark hued Arabs of the northern deserts; cursing camel drivers urging on their vicious charges; overburdened donkeys, waving sadly pendulous ears while they endured with stoic patience the brutalities of their masters; goats, sheep and horses.
In his regiment Maximilian Morrel was noted for his rigid observance, not only of the obligations imposed on a soldier, but also of the duties of a man; and he thus gained the name of "the stoic.
The men, pitching forward insanely, had burst into cheerings, moblike and barbaric, but tuned in strange keys that can arouse the dullard and the stoic.
He had read somewhere that every man was born a Platonist, an Aristotelian, a Stoic, or an Epicurean; and the history of George Henry Lewes (besides telling you that philosophy was all moonshine) was there to show that the thought of each philospher was inseparably connected with the man he was.
And in the shelter of the hut, La paced to and fro beside the stoic ape-man.
To sage Philosophy next lend thine ear, From heaven descended to the low-roofed house Of Socrates--see there his tenement-- Whom, well inspired, the Oracle pronounced Wisest of men; from whose mouth issued forth Mellifluous streams, that watered all the schools Of Academics old and new, with those Surnamed Peripatetics, and the sect Epicurean, and the Stoic severe.
And what had John Barleycorn to do with such strenuous, Stoic toil of a lad just turned fifteen?
With a loftier morality than that of the Epicureans, and a sterner sense of man's duties, Zeno and the Stoic philosophers prescribed suicide in certain cases to their followers.
Of course, I was burning with anger, but pride obliged me to suppress my feelings, and preserve a smooth face, or at least a stoic calmness, throughout the interview.
He knew the panic of terror which the scent of the Gomangani inspired within that savage breast, and as night drew on, hope died within his heart and in the stoic calm of the wild beast which he was, he resigned himself to meet the fate which awaited him.
So all that is said of the wise man by Stoic or Oriental or modern essayist, describes to each reader his own idea, describes his unattained but attainable self.