stop motion

(redirected from Stop-action)

stop motion

n.
A filming technique used in animation, in which the camera is stopped after filming each frame or every few frames so as to allow objects within the scene, such as clay figures or paper cutouts, to be adjusted for the following frame.

stop′-mo′tion adj.
References in periodicals archive ?
She has plenty of topics and techniques--from a stop-action secret dance fest in her library to a fake ad for alarm clocks to drawing lessons with friends.
Capability: SAM Animation software allows users to make stop-action animations of their choice of content.
His works usually begin as short lengths of film, which he condenses into clips, projects onto an animation table, and represents on pieces of paper (often numbering in the thousands) that he then shoots in stop-action video.
The cameras enable videos to be automatically turned into stop-action still pictures for printing and sharing.
When the dancers crossed the stage, their episodic disappearance evoked the stop-action photography of Muybridge or a frieze on a Greek urn.
Her small, dollhouse-like pieces can be viewed as a single moment from a play, with a unique cast of characters caught in stop-action scenarios.
All three videos will run simultaneously in slow motion, and can be placed in stop-action or run one at a time.
I think we can do a stop-action move like in the movie 'The Matrix' .
Lessons, based on stop-action photographs of Gunn executing trouble shots at area courses, can be accessed at www.
Having taken four years to make, The Miracle Worker is certain to cause a stir, if only for its unusual combination of stop-action, 3D animation and digitally animated drawings.
Whether watching them as noteworthy examples of three-dimensional stop-action animation or simply for the sheer fun of it, these award-winning programs are a joy for viewers of all ages.
Computer analysis transforms the stop-action frames into velocities yielding, for the first time, a quantitative portrait of a soap film's swirls, report Michael Rivera of the University of Pittsburgh and Peter Vorobieff and Robert E.