streptococcus

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Related to Streptococcal infection: Group B streptococcal infection

strep·to·coc·cus

 (strĕp′tə-kŏk′əs)
n. pl. strep·to·coc·ci (-kŏk′sī, -kŏk′ī)
Any of various round gram-positive bacteria of the genus Streptococcus that occur in pairs or chains and can cause various infections in humans, including strep throat, erysipelas, and scarlet fever.

strep·to·coc·cal (-kŏk′əl), strep·to·coc·cic (-kŏk′sĭk, -kŏk′ĭk) adj.

streptococcus

(ˌstrɛptəʊˈkɒkəs)
n, pl -cocci (-ˈkɒkaɪ; US -ˈkɒksaɪ)
(Microbiology) any Gram-positive spherical bacterium of the genus Streptococcus, typically occurring in chains and including many pathogenic species, such as S. pyogenes, which causes scarlet fever, sore throat, etc: family Lactobacillaceae. Often shortened to: strep
streptococcal, streptococcic adj

strep•to•coc•cus

(ˌstrɛp təˈkɒk əs)

n., pl. -coc•ci (-ˈkɒk saɪ, -si)
any of several spherical bacteria of the genus Streptococcus, occurring in pairs or chains, species of which cause such diseases as tonsillitis, pneumonia, and scarlet fever.
[1875–80; < New Latin; see strepto-, coccus]
strep`to•coc′cal (-ˈkɒk əl) strep`to•coc′cic (-ˈkɒk sɪk) adj.

strep·to·coc·cus

(strĕp′tə-kŏk′əs)
Plural streptococci (strĕp′tə-kŏk′sī, strĕp′tə-kŏk′ī)
Any of various bacteria that are normally found on the skin and mucous membranes and in the digestive tract of mammals. One kind of streptococcus causes especially severe infections in humans, including strep throat, scarlet fever, pneumonia, and blood infections.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.streptococcus - spherical Gram-positive bacteria occurring in pairs or chainsstreptococcus - spherical Gram-positive bacteria occurring in pairs or chains; cause e.g. scarlet fever and tonsillitis
eubacteria, eubacterium, true bacteria - a large group of bacteria having rigid cell walls; motile types have flagella
genus Streptococcus - a genus of bacteria
Translations
streptobacillestreptococciestreptocoque

streptococcus

[ˌstreptəʊˈkɒkəs] N (streptococci (pl)) [ˌstreptəʊˈkɒkaɪ]estreptococo m

streptococcus

n pl <streptococci> → Streptokokkus m

strep·to·coc·cus

n. estreptococo, género de microorganismo de la tribu Streptococceae, bacterias gram-positivas que se agrupan en pares o cadenas y que causan enfermedades serias.
References in periodicals archive ?
Invasive group A streptococcal infection cases and deaths among persons age [greater than or equal to] 65 y, by site, ABCs areas, 1998-2003 * 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 No.
The second is NX-B5886 for the treatment of streptococcal infection.
His research interests include the epidemiology of streptococcal infection and rheumatic fever.
Although NSAIDs may neither alter the risk of developing an invasive GAS infection nor accelerate an established infection, these drugs can mollify the signs and symptoms of streptococcal infection, possibly delaying appropriate management and treatment (3).
Invasive group A streptococcal infection and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug use among children with primary varicella.
The QuickVue Dipstick Strep A test is intended for use as an aid in the diagnosis of Group A Streptococcal infection, a common bacterial infection associated with "strep throat.
Due to its common presentation after a streptococcal infection and probable completion of antibiotic therapy, it is important not to confuse guttate psoriasis with an antibiotic allergy due to the treatment of the allergy worsening the psoriasis.
Donna, who receives six hours of dialysis three times a week, started treatment at the age of 16 after a streptococcal infection destroyed both kidneys.
He had a positive throat culture for beta-hemolytic streptococcus which was performed at the initial hospital, but we wanted to confirm the antecedent streptococcal infection and investigated the serum antistreptolysin O (ASO) titer.
The youngster, who cannot be identified, was born with a streptococcal infection, which medics negligently failed to treat in time.
Another important consideration is the possibility of recurrent episodes of myocarditis secondary to streptococcal infection in previously affected patients.
Dr Theresa Lamagni, PHE's head of streptococcal infection surveillance, said that after the scarlet fever season peaks within the next few weeks, a reduction in numbers should begin to be seen.

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