streptococcus

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strep·to·coc·cus

 (strĕp′tə-kŏk′əs)
n. pl. strep·to·coc·ci (-kŏk′sī, -kŏk′ī)
Any of various round gram-positive bacteria of the genus Streptococcus that occur in pairs or chains and can cause various infections in humans, including strep throat, erysipelas, and scarlet fever.

strep·to·coc·cal (-kŏk′əl), strep·to·coc·cic (-kŏk′sĭk, -kŏk′ĭk) adj.

streptococcus

(ˌstrɛptəʊˈkɒkəs)
n, pl -cocci (-ˈkɒkaɪ; US -ˈkɒksaɪ)
(Microbiology) any Gram-positive spherical bacterium of the genus Streptococcus, typically occurring in chains and including many pathogenic species, such as S. pyogenes, which causes scarlet fever, sore throat, etc: family Lactobacillaceae. Often shortened to: strep
streptococcal, streptococcic adj

strep•to•coc•cus

(ˌstrɛp təˈkɒk əs)

n., pl. -coc•ci (-ˈkɒk saɪ, -si)
any of several spherical bacteria of the genus Streptococcus, occurring in pairs or chains, species of which cause such diseases as tonsillitis, pneumonia, and scarlet fever.
[1875–80; < New Latin; see strepto-, coccus]
strep`to•coc′cal (-ˈkɒk əl) strep`to•coc′cic (-ˈkɒk sɪk) adj.

strep·to·coc·cus

(strĕp′tə-kŏk′əs)
Plural streptococci (strĕp′tə-kŏk′sī, strĕp′tə-kŏk′ī)
Any of various bacteria that are normally found on the skin and mucous membranes and in the digestive tract of mammals. One kind of streptococcus causes especially severe infections in humans, including strep throat, scarlet fever, pneumonia, and blood infections.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.streptococcus - spherical Gram-positive bacteria occurring in pairs or chainsstreptococcus - spherical Gram-positive bacteria occurring in pairs or chains; cause e.g. scarlet fever and tonsillitis
eubacteria, eubacterium, true bacteria - a large group of bacteria having rigid cell walls; motile types have flagella
genus Streptococcus - a genus of bacteria
Translations
streptobacillestreptococciestreptocoque

streptococcus

[ˌstreptəʊˈkɒkəs] N (streptococci (pl)) [ˌstreptəʊˈkɒkaɪ]estreptococo m

streptococcus

n pl <streptococci> → Streptokokkus m

strep·to·coc·cus

n. estreptococo, género de microorganismo de la tribu Streptococceae, bacterias gram-positivas que se agrupan en pares o cadenas y que causan enfermedades serias.
References in periodicals archive ?
INDICATION AND USAGE DALVANCE (dalbavancin) for injection is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) caused by susceptible isolates of the following Gram-positive microorganisms: Staphylococcus aureus (including methicillin-susceptible and methicillin-resistant strains),Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus agalactiae, and Streptococcus anginosus group (including S.
Bacteria and yeast pathogens identified by the FilmArray ME Panel are Escherichia coli K1, Haemophilus influenzae, Listeria monocytogenes, Neisseria meningitidis, Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Cryptococcus neoformans/gattii.
Time to recovery of microorganisms from automated blood culture system Number of microorganisms Organism recovered Usually pathogenic microorganisms by day 1 2 3 Gram-positive cocci Staphylococcus aureus 410 261 75 Streptococcus agalactiae 30 0 0 Streptococcus pneumoniae 51 0 0 Group G Streptococcus 9 0 0 Streptococcus pyogenes 22 1 0 Enterococcus avium 3 0 0 Enterococcus faecalis 78 7 5 Enterococcus faecium 38 6 0 Micrococcus spp.
oxytoca, Proteus mirabilis, Enterobacter cloacae, Enterobacter aerogenes, Morganella morganii, Serratia marcescens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii, Streptococcus agalactiae, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, and S.
Gram-positive bacteria, in particular Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus agalactiae are the most common pathogens in ABSSSI.
Streptococcus agalactiae or group B streptococcus (GBS) [3] is one example of severe infectious diseases that cause sepsis and meningitis in neonates (1).
In our study MIC and MBC values of thymol, EDTA and vancomycin were evaluated against several standard strains and clinical isolates of (Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus agalactiae, VRE Van B, Bacillus subtilis) and Gram-negative pathogens bacteria (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae.
the rest are Enterobacter cloacae (deep blue colonies), Streptococcus agalactiae (whitish brown colonies), Candida albicans (cream colonies) and Staphylococcus saprophyticus (deep brown colonies).
Group B streptococcus (GBS) infections, caused by the bacterium streptococcus agalactiae, are the most common cause of meningitis, septicaemia and pneumonia in newborn babies.
A total of 260 clinical isolates were tested including: Enterobacteriaceae (112), Streptococcus pneumoniae (52), Streptococcus pyogenes (5), Streptococcus agalactiae (3), viridans streptococci (2), Staphylococcus aureus (30) and Haemophilus influenzae (56).
5,9] Bacteroides fragilis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Staphylococus epidermidis, Streptococcus intermedius, Streptococcus agalactiae and Candida albicans [sup.