streptococcus

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strep·to·coc·cus

 (strĕp′tə-kŏk′əs)
n. pl. strep·to·coc·ci (-kŏk′sī, -kŏk′ī)
Any of various round gram-positive bacteria of the genus Streptococcus that occur in pairs or chains and can cause various infections in humans, including strep throat, erysipelas, and scarlet fever.

strep·to·coc·cal (-kŏk′əl), strep·to·coc·cic (-kŏk′sĭk, -kŏk′ĭk) adj.

streptococcus

(ˌstrɛptəʊˈkɒkəs)
n, pl -cocci (-ˈkɒkaɪ; US -ˈkɒksaɪ)
(Microbiology) any Gram-positive spherical bacterium of the genus Streptococcus, typically occurring in chains and including many pathogenic species, such as S. pyogenes, which causes scarlet fever, sore throat, etc: family Lactobacillaceae. Often shortened to: strep
streptococcal, streptococcic adj

strep•to•coc•cus

(ˌstrɛp təˈkɒk əs)

n., pl. -coc•ci (-ˈkɒk saɪ, -si)
any of several spherical bacteria of the genus Streptococcus, occurring in pairs or chains, species of which cause such diseases as tonsillitis, pneumonia, and scarlet fever.
[1875–80; < New Latin; see strepto-, coccus]
strep`to•coc′cal (-ˈkɒk əl) strep`to•coc′cic (-ˈkɒk sɪk) adj.

strep·to·coc·cus

(strĕp′tə-kŏk′əs)
Plural streptococci (strĕp′tə-kŏk′sī, strĕp′tə-kŏk′ī)
Any of various bacteria that are normally found on the skin and mucous membranes and in the digestive tract of mammals. One kind of streptococcus causes especially severe infections in humans, including strep throat, scarlet fever, pneumonia, and blood infections.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.streptococcus - spherical Gram-positive bacteria occurring in pairs or chainsstreptococcus - spherical Gram-positive bacteria occurring in pairs or chains; cause e.g. scarlet fever and tonsillitis
eubacteria, eubacterium, true bacteria - a large group of bacteria having rigid cell walls; motile types have flagella
genus Streptococcus - a genus of bacteria
Translations
streptobacillestreptococciestreptocoque

streptococcus

[ˌstreptəʊˈkɒkəs] N (streptococci (pl)) [ˌstreptəʊˈkɒkaɪ]estreptococo m

streptococcus

n pl <streptococci> → Streptokokkus m

strep·to·coc·cus

n. estreptococo, género de microorganismo de la tribu Streptococceae, bacterias gram-positivas que se agrupan en pares o cadenas y que causan enfermedades serias.
References in periodicals archive ?
68 mS/cm higher ELHMF, than with subclinically Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus uberis, Streptococcus dysgalaetia (P<0.
The other major isolates found were Streptococcus agalactiae, Strep.
Organisms commonly implicated in AV and associated with negative pregnancy and neonatal outcomes include Escherichia coli, Group B streptococci (also known as Streptococcus agalactiae and referred to as GBS for the remainder of this review), Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus (18,31,32), and when acquired during the perinatal period, may be associated with a high neonatal mortality due to septicemia, meningitis or pneumonia (32,33).
Among bacteria that cause mortality in tilapia pathogens of Flavobacterium columnare stand out, Edwardsiella tarda, Aeromonas sp, Vibrio sp, Francisella sp, Streptococcus iniae, Streptococcus agalactiae, Vibrio anguillarum, V harveyi, Photobacterium damsele subsp.
Streptococcus agalactiae y Streptococcus iniae son las principales especies bacterianas que afectan la produccion de tilapia en el mundo (8).
6) The common organisms include Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus haemolyticus, Proteus, Streptococcus agalactiae, E.
Biofire Blood Culture ID Panel--can simultaneously detect Enterococcus species, Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus species, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus species, Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes, Acinetobacter baumannii, Haemophilus influenza, Neisseria meningib'des, Psuedomonas aeruginosa, Enterobacteriaceae species, Enterobacter cloacae complex, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella oxytoca, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus species, Serratia marcescens, Candida albicans, Candida glabrate, Candida krusei, Candida parapsilosis, and Candida tropicalis.
In developed countries, the epidemiology of EOS has been well described with Streptococcus agalactiae, also referred as group B streptococcus (GBS), and Escherichia coli responsible for most of the severe cases.
Standardization and evaluation of the CAMP reaction for the prompt, presumptive identification of Streptococcus agalactiae (Lancefield group B) in clinical material.