masque

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masque

also mask  (măsk)
n.
1. A dramatic entertainment, usually performed by masked players representing mythological or allegorical figures, that was popular in England in the 1500s and early 1600s.
2. A dramatic verse composition written for such an entertainment.

[French; see mask.]

masque

(mɑːsk) or

mask

n
1. (Theatre) a dramatic entertainment of the 16th to 17th centuries in England, consisting of pantomime, dancing, dialogue, and song, often performed at court
2. (Theatre) the words and music written for a masque
3. (Clothing & Fashion) short for masquerade
[C16: variant of mask]

masque

or mask

(mæsk, mɑsk)

n.
1. an elaborate court entertainment in England in the 16th and 17th centuries combining pantomime, dialogue, music, singing, dancing, and mechanical effects.
2. a dramatic composition for such entertainment.
[1505–15; < Middle French]

masque

A typical European Renaissance dramatic form, with actors using masks and costumes.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.masque - a party of guests wearing costumes and masksmasque - a party of guests wearing costumes and masks
fancy-dress ball, masked ball, masquerade ball - a ball at which guests wear costumes and masks
party - a group of people gathered together for pleasure; "she joined the party after dinner"
Translations

masque

[mɑːsk] Nmascarada f

masque

nMaskenspiel nt
References in periodicals archive ?
As a late Stuart masque, Comus enabled new possibilities for girl performers: Lady Alice Egerton, playing the lead role of the Lady, was a true dramatic heroine, and the masque ultimately defends the presence of girls on the stage (149).
A specific Stuart masque shaped by contemporary events is sometimes the template.
Commentators on the Stuart masque observe that the genre is also marked by its inherent trickery, its fleeting nature, and its "vanity of art" (214).
She shows how evidence of dancing, with its accompanying music, and of colourful costume, topped off with mask or make-up and enhanced by lighting, can present a more vivid, albeit blurred, image of the theatrical impact and cultural significance of the early Stuart masque than either Inigo Jones's designs, which were intended as working drawings for scene painters and costume makers, or textual records intended, particularly in Ben Jonson's case, to celebrate the printed word as much as the event it commemorated.
In The Early Stuart Masque, Ravelhofer reattaches "body" to "soul" by situating the literary evidence of masque productions within a groundbreaking cultural and practical study of the ephemerae of early modern dance and costume.
First, Ravelhofer takes a far more European approach to the early Stuart masque than has typically been the case in Anglophone scholarship.
In some sense, the performative genre referred to as the Stuart masque functioned as such a tribute, expressed by means of all the creative disciplines that were at its makers' disposal.
The final chapter looks at Time and the deities (Jupiter, Diana, Ceres, Iris, Juno, Mars, Venus, and Hymen) in the late plays, particularly in connection with the flourishing of the Stuart masque.
The courtly entertainments known as mummings constitute the prehistory of the celebrated Stuart masque.
These various studies by Raylor and Knowles offer us much new information about the Stuart masque and its impact on court and culture.
As the Stuart masque evolved--novelty and surprise being a driving force in its development--attitudes to the dancing shifted, and it becomes important to distinguish between different groups of performers.
For the music one will still need to turn to Andrew Sabol's Four Hundred Songs and Dances from the Stuart Masque (Hanover, N.