suasory

suasory

(ˈsweɪzərɪ)
adj
another word for suasive
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References in periodicals archive ?
Plato's critique of myth and its dangers--and his discussion of the circumstances under which myth should be used--is based, amongst others, on two main characteristics: its "unfalsifiable" nature (9), which constitutes a radical difference from the argument based on logos; and its suasory power, namely its capacity to persuade through addressing the emotions, rather than the intellect (120-1).
Lumumba's aggressive and unrelenting anti-colonial ideology was said to have brought unbearable suffering, and the suasory power of oratory supposedly contributed to mutual misunderstandings.
The kampung is, as I have described it elsewhere, a site of romantic ritual, one which draws urban Malay professionals into a moral pull of material and traditional obligation to parents, place, and duty, then pushes them back to their city lives to fulfill their equally suasory obligation to NEP modernity and self-development.
I mean those scholars who contemplate the nature and processes of language and language-users, especially language with suasory impact.
merely informative but also suasory, "a speech in miniature"
For example, some critical rhetorical theorists share the view of Carolyn Miller (1996) that "rhetoric is the suasory dimension pervading all discourse, to different degrees and in different ways" (p.
We believe, and will be aggressively arguing, that the suasory force of these positions, together with the theoretical basis that sustains them, owes more to politics than the validity of their social theory.
The most narrow views consider only reasoned suasory discourse to be argument (in its various forms referred to as making an argument, argument as a noun, or argument as product) while the most broad definitions include virtually any human action that can have some symbolic value assigned to it (called argument as process, argument as verb, or argument as "disagreement relevant expansion" [Willard, 1989]).
A different perspective is offered by Klingle and Burgoon (1995), who suggest that the relationship is indirectly causal, such that "Adequate satisfaction with the interaction and favorable provider evaluations determine the reward value of the communicator, which influences the effectiveness of suasory attempts" (p.
Two well-known definitions by contemporary rhetoricians reflect this trend: Donald C Bryant's definition, "I take rhetoric to be the rationale of informative and suasory discourse" (1974, p.