subrace


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subrace

(ˈsʌbˌreɪs)
n
(Anthropology & Ethnology) a subdivision of a race
References in periodicals archive ?
As expected, the two LCs Barbela and Barbela 0248 were closely related, the latter being considered as a subrace of Barbela, a very old Portuguese LC showing impressively wide adaptation to different environments, in particular high acid soil and drought tolerance.
Resistance genes derived from Subrace M1 include Co-2 for anthracnose resistance (Mastenbroek, 1960).
On the other hand, Subrace M1 already presents some of the highest yield potential in bush beans.
Most small-seeded landraces from the Andean zone and the Caribbean clustered with the Central American Subrace M2.
Germplasm of Subrace D2 from the eastern extreme of the volcanic axis may offer useful variability in agronomic traits that has not yet been recognized.
Subrace D1 occurs most frequently to the north of the volcanic axis in the dry highland plateau.
It is mostly among the subraces of Europe that we observe these dreadful outbursts of the bellicose instinct, in which everyone can only think of the most deadly and expeditious way to render powerless and dominate an adversary, who has become an implacable enemy (Equality 380).
Relationship between chromosomal races/ subraces in the brachypterous grasshopper Podisma sapporensis (Orthoptera: Acrididae) inferred from mitochondrial ND2 and COI gene sequences.
Society's division into White, Black, and Indian and considered biologically and culturally distinct races, did not generate synthesis but a subdivision of crossbred and distinct subraces classified as caboclo, mulato, mameluco, cafusos, etc.
Extension of longevity in Drosophila mojavensis by environmental ethanol: difference between subraces.
By the early 1960s, Race A and B resistance genes were defeated by the emergence of Race M, purportedly, a complex of 17 to 22 highly virulent subraces (Petrov, 1968; Melero-Vara et al.