succession

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Related to Successions: secessions

suc·ces·sion

 (sək-sĕsh′ən)
n.
1. The act or process of following in order or sequence.
2. A group of people or things arranged or following in order; a sequence: "A succession of one-man stalls offered soft drinks" (Alec Waugh). See Synonyms at series.
3.
a. The sequence in which one person after another succeeds to a title, throne, or position.
b. The right of a person or a line of persons to so succeed.
4.
a. The act or process of succeeding to the rights or duties of another.
b. The act or process of becoming entitled as a legal beneficiary to the property of a deceased person.
5. Ecology The gradual replacement of one type of ecological community by another in the same area, involving a series of orderly changes, especially in the dominant vegetation, and often resulting in the establishment of a climax community.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin successiō, successiōn-, from successus, past participle of succēdere, to succeed; see succeed.]

suc·ces′sion·al adj.
suc·ces′sion·al·ly adv.

succession

(səkˈsɛʃən)
n
1. the act or an instance of one person or thing following another
2. a number of people or things following one another in order
3. the act, process, or right by which one person succeeds to the office, etc, of another
4. the order that determines how one person or thing follows another
5. (Heraldry) a line of descent to a title, etc
6. (Biology) ecology the sum of the changes in the composition of a community that occur during its development towards a stable climax community
7. in succession in a manner such that one thing is followed uninterruptedly by another
[C14: from Latin successio, from succēdere to succeed]
sucˈcessional adj
sucˈcessionally adv

suc•ces•sion

(səkˈsɛʃ ən)

n.
1. the coming of one person or thing after another in order or in the course of events.
2. a number of persons or things following one another in order.
3. the right, act, or process by which one person succeeds to the office, rank, estate, or the like of another.
4. the order or line of those entitled to succeed one another.
5. the descent or transmission of a throne, dignity, estate, or the like.
6. the progressive replacement of one ecological community by another until a climax community is established.
[1275–1325; Middle English < Latin successiō=succed-, variant s. of succēdere to succeed + -tiō -tion]
suc•ces′sion•al, adj.
suc•ces′sion•al•ly, adv.
syn: See series.

suc·ces·sion

(sək-sĕsh′ən)
The gradual replacement of one type of ecological community by another, involving a series of changes especially in the dominant vegetation. For example, if a meadow is left unmowed, its grasses might be replaced first by fast-growing bushes and conifers, which after some years might be replaced in turn by slower-growing hardwoods. See more at climax community.

Succession

 a series of things.
Examples: succession of all ages, 1605; of bishops, 1594; of facts; of heirs; of popes, 1579; of prophets, 1662; of rain, 1797; of worldly things, 1577; of victories, 1849.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.succession - a following of one thing after another in time; "the doctor saw a sequence of patients"
temporal arrangement, temporal order - arrangement of events in time
pelting, rain - anything happening rapidly or in quick successive; "a rain of bullets"; "a pelting of insults"
rotation - a planned recurrent sequence (of crops or personnel etc.); "crop rotation makes a balanced demand on the fertility of the soil"; "the manager had only four starting pitchers in his rotation"
row - a continuous chronological succession without an interruption; "they won the championship three years in a row"
run - an unbroken chronological sequence; "the play had a long run on Broadway"; "the team enjoyed a brief run of victories"
2.succession - a group of people or things arranged or following in order; "a succession of stalls offering soft drinks"; "a succession of failures"
series - similar things placed in order or happening one after another; "they were investigating a series of bank robberies"
cascade - a succession of stages or operations or processes or units; "progressing in severity as though a cascade of genetic damage was occurring"; "separation of isotopes by a cascade of processes"
parade - an extended (often showy) succession of persons or things; "a parade of strollers on the mall"; "a parade of witnesses"
streak, run - an unbroken series of events; "had a streak of bad luck"; "Nicklaus had a run of birdies"
3.succession - the action of following in order; "he played the trumps in sequence"
chess opening, opening - a recognized sequence of moves at the beginning of a game of chess; "he memorized all the important chess openings"
ordering, order - the act of putting things in a sequential arrangement; "there were mistakes in the ordering of items on the list"
alternation - successive change from one thing or state to another and back again; "a trill is a rapid alternation between the two notes"
4.succession - (ecology) the gradual and orderly process of change in an ecosystem brought about by the progressive replacement of one community by another until a stable climax is established
bionomics, environmental science, ecology - the branch of biology concerned with the relations between organisms and their environment
natural action, natural process, action, activity - a process existing in or produced by nature (rather than by the intent of human beings); "the action of natural forces"; "volcanic activity"
5.succession - acquisition of property by descent or by willsuccession - acquisition of property by descent or by will
acquisition - the act of contracting or assuming or acquiring possession of something; "the acquisition of wealth"; "the acquisition of one company by another"

succession

noun
1. series, run, sequence, course, order, train, flow, chain, cycle, procession, continuation, progression He took a succession of jobs which have stood him in good stead.
2. taking over, assumption, inheritance, elevation, accession, entering upon She is now seventh in line of succession to the throne.
in succession one after the other, running, successively, consecutively, on the trot (informal), one behind the other They needed to reach the World Cup final for the third time in succession.

succession

noun
1. A way in which things follow each other in space or time:
2. A number of things placed or occurring one after the other:
Informal: streak.
Translations
حَق الخِلافَه أو إسْتِلام الحُكْمخِلافَه في الحُكْمسِلْسِلَه مُتوالِيَه
následnictvínastoupenínástupnictvíposloupnostsérie
arvefølgeefterfølgelserækketronfølge
trónöröklésutódlás
erfîarétturòaî aî taka viî erfîum/stöîuröî, runa
nastúpenienástupníctvo
birbirini izleyen şeylergeçmeyerine geçme/alma hakkı

succession

[səkˈseʃən]
A. N
1. (= series) → sucesión f, serie f
after a succession of disastersdespués de una sucesión or serie de catástrofes
they each went in succession to the headmasterfueron todos a ver al director uno detrás de otro
she has won three games in successionha ganado tres partidos seguidos or sucesivos or consecutivos
he was my tutor two years in successionfue mi tutor dos años seguidos or consecutivos
for the third day/year in successionpor tercer día/año consecutivo
in close or quick or rapid successionuno tras de otro, en rápida sucesión
four times in successioncuatro veces seguidas
2. (to a post) → sucesión f
in succession to sbsucediendo a algn
Princess Rebecca is seventh in (line of) succession to the thronela princesa Rebeca ocupa el séptimo puesto en la línea de sucesión a la corona
3. (= descendants) → descendencia f
B. CPD succession duty Nderechos mpl de sucesión

succession

[səkˈsɛʃən] n
(= series) → succession f
in succession → à la suite
in quick succession → à bref intervalle, à brefs intervalles
three years in succession → trois ans de suite
(to throne, title)succession f

succession

n
Folge f, → Serie f; (with no intervening period) → (Aufeinander)folge f, → Kette f; a succession of visitorseine Kette or Serie von Besuchern; life is a succession of joys and sorrowsdas Leben ist ein steter Wechsel von Kummer und Freude; in successionnacheinander, hintereinander; in quick or rapid successionin rascher Folge, schnell hintereinander
(to post) → Nachfolge f; (to throne) → Thronfolge f; (to title, estate) → Erbfolge f; his succession to the officeseine Amtsübernahme; his succession to the titleseine Übernahme des Titels; her succession to the throneihre Thronbesteigung; in succession to somebodyals jds Nachfolger(in) m(f), → in jds Nachfolge (dat) (geh); fourth in (line of) succession to the thronean vierter Stelle in der Thronfolge ? apostolic

succession

[səkˈsɛʃn] n
a. (series) → serie f inv
in succession → di seguito
in quick succession → in rapida successione
b. (to post) → successione f

succeed

(səkˈsiːd) verb
1. to manage to do what one is trying to do; to achieve one's aim or purpose. He succeeded in persuading her to do it; He's happy to have succeeded in his chosen career; She tried three times to pass her driving-test, and at last succeeded; Our new teaching methods seem to be succeeding.
2. to follow next in order, and take the place of someone or something else. He succeeded his father as manager of the firm / as king; The cold summer was succeeded by a stormy autumn; If the duke has no children, who will succeed to (= inherit) his property?
success (səkˈses) noun
1. (the prosperity gained by) the achievement of an aim or purpose. He has achieved great success as an actor / in his career.
2. a person or thing that succeeds or prospers. She's a great success as a teacher.
sucˈcessful (-ˈses-) adjective
(negative unsuccessful) having success. Were you successful in finding a new house?; The successful applicant for this job will be required to start work next month; a successful career.
sucˈcessfully adverb
succession (səkˈseʃən) noun
1. the right of succeeding to a throne as king, to a title etc. The Princess is fifth in (order of) succession (to the throne).
2. a number of things following after one another. a succession of bad harvests.
3. the act or process of following and taking the place of someone or something else. his succession to the throne.
successive (səkˈsesiv) adjective
following one after the other. He won three successive matches.
sucˈcessively (-ˈsesiv-) adverb
sucˈcessor (-ˈse-) noun
a person who follows, and take the place of another. Who will be appointed as the manager's successor?
in succession
one after another. five wet days in succession.
References in periodicals archive ?
Considering that the labor force migration, as well as free circulation of the European citizens within the communitarian space represents both rights and phenomena more and more outlined, the incidence of the successions with extraneous elements is higher and higher.
Andrew Mainwaring, Investment Director at Inflexion, commented: Securing additional investment from HSBC underlines the stability and success of Successions plan to create the UKs largest independent wealth management business through a focused buy & build programme.
8 billion per company -- more than would have been lost if those successions had been planned.
Second, at its most fundamental, this is a case study collection of best and worst successions, and the technical, political, and cultural factors that created them.
But the reality in planning for CEO successions is far from ideal.
17) Known as the doctrine of the "king's two bodies," the conceptual separation between the monarch's "body politic" and "body natural" allowed the authority of the Crown and royal dignity to be preserved and protected during successions.
4 percent of all successions were nonvoluntary departures, the highest rate since 2003.
This study examines marathon successions, which I define as top executive searches that are extended past the formal departure notice of the incumbent chief executive officer (CEO).
The regulation aimed at simplifying the settlement of cross-border successions - proposed in October 2009 - was adopted by the Justice Council, on 7 June.
When the known devil is better than an unknown god: An empirical study of the antecedents and consequences of relay CEO successions.
Similarly, forced successions were also viewed as wealth creating activities by the financial market.

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