placebo

(redirected from Sugar pill)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

pla·ce·bo

 (plə-sē′bō)
n. pl. pla·ce·bos or pla·ce·boes
1.
a. A substance that has positive effects as a result of a patient's perception that it is beneficial rather than as a result of a causative ingredient.
b. An inactive substance or preparation used as a control in an experiment or test to determine the effectiveness of a medicinal drug.
2. Something of no intrinsic remedial value that is used to appease or reassure another.
3. (plä-chā′bō) Roman Catholic Church The service or office of vespers for the dead.

[Latin placēbō, I shall please, first person sing. future tense of Latin placēre, to please; see plāk- in Indo-European roots. Sense 3, from Late Latin placēbō, I shall please, the first word of the first antiphon of the vespers service (taken from a phrase in the following psalm, placēbō Dominō in regiōne vīvōrum, "I shall please the Lord in the land of the living").]
Word History: Like the word dirge, placebo has its origin in the Office of the Dead, the cycle of prayers traditionally sung or recited for the repose of the souls of the dead. The traditional liturgical language of the Roman Catholic Church is Latin, and in Latin, the first word of the first antiphon of the vespers service is placēbō, "I shall please." This word is taken from a phrase in the psalm text that is recited after the antiphon, placēbō Dominō in regiōne vīvōrum, "I shall please the Lord in the land of the living." The vespers service of the Office of the Dead came to be called placebo in Middle English, and the expression sing placebo came to mean "to flatter, be obsequious." Chaucer, for example, uses the phrase on two occasions. In the Summoner's Tale, a friar offers the following piece of advice: Beth war, therfor, with lordes how ye pleye. / Singeth placebo and 'I shal if I kan,' "Be wary, therefore, how you deal with lords. / Sing 'Placebo' and 'I shall if I can.'" Placebo eventually came to mean "flatterer" and "sycophant." In the 1700s, placebo began to be used of prescriptions written by a physician solely to please a patient, as by satisfying the patient's desire to take medicine. In many cases, the patient would actually benefit, thanks to what became known as the placebo effect. Later, placebo came to refer to neutral substances used in controlled studies testing the effectiveness of medications.

placebo

(pləˈsiːbəʊ)
n, pl -bos or -boes
1. (Medicine) med an inactive substance or other sham form of therapy administered to a patient usually to compare its effects with those of a real drug or treatment, but sometimes for the psychological benefit to the patient through his believing he is receiving treatment. See also control group, placebo effect
2. something said or done to please or humour another
3. (Roman Catholic Church) RC Church a traditional name for the vespers of the office for the dead
[C13 (in the ecclesiastical sense): from Latin Placebo Domino I shall please the Lord (from the opening of the office for the dead); C19 (in the medical sense)]

pla•ce•bo

(pləˈsi boʊ for 1; plɑˈtʃeɪ boʊ for 2)

n., pl. -bos, -boes.
1.
a. a substance having no pharmacological effect but given to placate a patient who supposes it to be a medicine.
b. a pharmacologically inactive substance or a sham procedure administered as a control in testing the efficacy of a drug or course of action.
2. the vespers for the office of the dead.
[1175–1225; Middle English < Latin placēbō I shall be pleasing, acceptable]

pla·ce·bo

(plə-sē′bō)
A substance resembling a drug but containing only inactive ingredients, used especially in scientific experiments to test the effectiveness of a drug. Researchers give one group of people a real drug and another group a placebo and then determine whether the people taking the drug get better results than the people taking the placebo.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.placebo - an innocuous or inert medication; given as a pacifier or to the control group in experiments on the efficacy of a drug
active placebo - a placebo used in experimental tests of a drug that has noticeable side effects; "an active placebo mimics the side effects of the experimental drug"
medicament, medication, medicinal drug, medicine - (medicine) something that treats or prevents or alleviates the symptoms of disease
2.placebo - (Roman Catholic Church) vespers of the office for the dead
vesper - a late afternoon or evening worship service
Church of Rome, Roman Catholic Church, Roman Church, Western Church, Roman Catholic - the Christian Church based in the Vatican and presided over by a pope and an episcopal hierarchy
Translations
lumelääkeplasebo

placebo

[pləˈsiːbəʊ]
A. N (placebos or placeboes (pl)) → placebo m
B. CPD placebo effect Nefecto m placebo

placebo

[pləˈsiːbəʊ] nplacebo mplacebo effect neffet m placeboplace card nmarque-place mplace mat nset m de table

placebo

n (Med) → Placebo nt

placebo

[pləˈsiːbəʊ] nplacebo m inv

pla·ce·bo

n. placebo, sustancia anodina sin valor medicinal gen. usada en experimentos comparativos;
___ controlled trialprueba de control ___.

placebo

n (pl -bos o -boes) placebo
References in periodicals archive ?
88 1 can reduce COCs efficacy and lead to pregnancy I have to use the 27 1 hormone pills for 21 days followed by sugar pills for 7 days and then start a new pack During the sugar pill 19.
You've probably heard of the concept of the placebo effect: Taking a sugar pill or some other inert substance produces symptom improvements because patients are told they're taking a real medication.
A sugar pill taken from a pack designed for a powerful anal- gesic will be more efficacious against pain than a sugar pill taken from a packet of sugar pills.
In 2012, solanezumab was shown to be no better than a sugar pill in clinical trials.
The difference between flibanserin and a sugar pill was deemed statistically insignificant in 2010 after a debate among the committee members which included seven women and four men.
In the placebo effect, patients given a nonmedically active substance, such as a sugar pill, report improvement in their condition because they think they have been given something that will help.
Today, homeopaths have to contend with chemical knowledge and have proposed that the curative effects are to be explained by the sequential dilutions leaving an imprint on the solution, although they appear to be at a loss to explain how such an image is transferred to a sugar pill or how a molecular ghost can have healing properties.
Scientists have long known that some people report noticeable improvements in pain and certain other symptoms when they're given a placebo, which can be a sugar pill or sham surgery or some other benign intervention.
How can an inert sugar pill have therapeutic value?
HUMOUR David Kemp's Well-Heeled Bitches Comedy sketches AS the man behind a new exhibition about the place of laughter in art puts it: "Humour is the sugar pill that lets us look at life and death.
MANETTE: I read somewhere that a drug only has to be better than a sugar pill
It prevents the four track EP from being no more than a sickly sweet sugar pill.