sul ponticello


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Related to sul ponticello: sul tasto

sul ponticello

with the bow close to the bridge
References in periodicals archive ?
At the same time, this approach gave a welcome humanizing dimension to the Quartet's more experimental elements (its numerous sections of glissandi, sul ponticello bowings, and so forth).
Certain mannerisms recurred - icy harmonics, juddering sul ponticello tremolandi - but more striking was the way the small form intensified each composer's individuality.
Here, on the model of Liszt, Foerster casts the form of the sonata cycle into a single continuous work, employs unusual harmony full of chromaticism and surprises us with a dramatic section enhanced by tremolo or the use of sul ponticello.
A studious tracking of motives distinguished the Sarabande, while the cellist offered a fresh angle during each repeated section of the Bouree, using a touch of sul ponticello, or bowing near the bridge, to bring out harmonics.
Sul Ponticello, see Directory of Open Access Journals announcement in this section.
Slavicky makes good use of fast movement in the lower registers played sul ponticello, while Z.
Chapter 6 (with the exception of a final section on improvisation that would more appropriately have been included in chapter 8) concerns "special effects": dynamics, harmonics, pizzicato, scordatura, con sordino, sul ponticello, vibrato, and portamento; of these, the last two differ from the others in that they are usually treated as ornaments in the methods.
Along with the usual sul ponticello and sul tasto effects, Takemitsu frequently calls for harmonics combined with glissandi - a common effect in Takemitsu's string writing that may derive from Messiaen.
Amy achieves a range of subtle and delicate timbres through a judicious combination of harmonics with regular fingerings, and col legno, sul ponticello, and pizzicato playing with ordinary bow strokes.
In a discussion of the right (bowing) hand, he covers variants of sul tasto, sul ponticello, and col legno playing and devotes far more consideration to transitions from one special effect to another and to jeu normal than would seem warranted, given that such indications are common neither in this collection nor in violin repertory generally.