sulfur

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sul·fur

also sul·phur  (sŭl′fər)
n.
1. Symbol S A pale yellow nonmetallic element occurring widely in nature in several free, allotropic and crystal forms and combined in numerous sulfates and sulfides. It is used in black gunpowder, rubber vulcanization, the manufacture of insecticides and pharmaceuticals, and in the preparation of sulfur compounds such as hydrogen sulfide and sulfuric acid. Atomic number 16; atomic weight 32.066; melting point 115.21°C; boiling point 444.61°C; specific gravity at 20°C (rhombic) 2.07, (monoclinic) 2.00; valence 2, 4, 6. See Periodic Table.
2. Any of various butterflies of the subfamily Coliadinae of the family Pieridae, having yellow or orange wings often marked with black.
tr.v. sul·fured, sul·fur·ing, sul·furs also sul·phured or sul·phur·ing or sul·phurs
To treat with sulfur or a compound of sulfur.

[Middle English, from Anglo-Norman sulfre, from Latin sulfur.]

sulfur

(ˈsʌlfə)
n
(Elements & Compounds) the US preferred spelling of sulphur

sul•fur

(ˈsʌl fər)

n.
1. Also, esp. Brit., sulphur. a nonmetallic element, ordinarily a flammable yellow solid, of widespread occurrence in combined form, as in sulfide and sulfate compounds and cellular protein: used esp. in making gunpowder and matches, in medicine, and in vulcanizing rubber.Symbol: S; at. wt.: 32.064; at. no.: 16; sp. gr.: 2.07 at 20° C.
[1300–50; Middle English < Latin sulp(h)ur, sulfur brimstone, sulfur]

sul·fur

also sul·phur (sŭl′fər)
Symbol S A pale-yellow, brittle nonmetallic element that occurs widely in nature, especially in volcanic deposits, many common minerals, natural gas, and petroleum. It is used to make gunpowder and fertilizer, to vulcanize rubber, and to produce sulfuric acid. Atomic number 16. See Periodic Table.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sulfur - an abundant tasteless odorless multivalent nonmetallic elementsulfur - an abundant tasteless odorless multivalent nonmetallic element; best known in yellow crystals; occurs in many sulphide and sulphate minerals and even in native form (especially in volcanic regions)
chemical element, element - any of the more than 100 known substances (of which 92 occur naturally) that cannot be separated into simpler substances and that singly or in combination constitute all matter
brimstone, native sulfur, native sulphur - an old name for sulfur
sulfide, sulphide - a compound of sulphur and some other element that is more electropositive
oil of vitriol, sulfuric acid, sulphuric acid, vitriol - (H2SO4) a highly corrosive acid made from sulfur dioxide; widely used in the chemical industry
Verb1.sulfur - treat with sulphur in order to preserve; "These dried fruits are sulphured"
process, treat - subject to a process or treatment, with the aim of readying for some purpose, improving, or remedying a condition; "process cheese"; "process hair"; "treat the water so it can be drunk"; "treat the lawn with chemicals" ; "treat an oil spill"
Translations
síra
svovl
SchwefelSulfur
sulfuro
väävel
rikki
sumpor
kén
belerangsulfur
brennisteinn
sulfursulpur
siera
sulf
síra
žveplo
svavel
lưu

sul·fur

n. azufre, sulfuro.
References in periodicals archive ?
Stable sulfur isotope partitioning during simulated petroleum formation as determined by hydrous pyrolysis of Ghareb Limestone, Israel.
To complete this project, sulfur isotope analysis of pyrite, As and other trace element analyses of black shale, pyrite, and bitumen, and Rock-Eval analyses of black shale were performed.
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Stable carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur isotope ratios in riparian food webs on rivers receiving sewage and pulp-mill effluents.
We studied the sulfur isotope composition of the same rocks used for the carbon isotope analyses - from Canada, South Africa, the U.
For example, Granek and colleagues (2009) used stable carbon and sulfur isotope ratios to determine the relative input of mangrove versus seagrass versus oceanic nutrient sources to the particulate organic matter (POM) taken up by a variety of benthic filter-feeding organisms, including sponges.
Sulfur isotope ratios are measured relative to the same ratio in a standard, which allows greater precision and renders comparable the results from all labs.
The influence of Harry Thode as Canada's first stable isotope geochemist and the father of sulfur isotope geochemistry extended far beyond his research accomplishments.
The use of stable sulfur isotope ratio analysis to assess selectivity of chemical analyses and extractions of forms of sulfur in coal.
Organic carbon and sulfide sulfur isotope studies from the O/S and S/D boundary sediments in Poland.