Sun Tzu


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Related to Sun Tzu: Machiavelli

Sun Tzu

 (so͝on′ so͞o′, so͞on′ tsŭ′) or Sun Zi (so͞on′ tsŭ′) fl. 4th cent. bc.
Chinese author credited with writing the influential treatise The Art of War.
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References in classic literature ?
Sun Tzu said: The art of war is of vital importance to the State.
THE saying "Keep your friends close - but your enemies closer" is widely believed to originate with Sun Tzu, the author of the ancient Chinese military strategy treatise "The Art of War".
After writing her first book, Sun Tzu for Women, Sheetz-Runkle realized that The Art of War had profound insights and applications for small businesses.
Sun Tzu wrote 2,500 years ago during an agricultural age but has remained relevant through both the industrial and information ages.
No wonder that Sun Tzu and Machiavelli are still frequently cited.
Wu's comments reflect the war tactics of ancient China's military general and philosopher Sun Tzu, who in his Art of War says: 'Appear weak when you are strong, and strong when you are weak.
The venerable Sun Tzu, master military strategist and tactician in his seminal compilation The Art of War viewed by one and all as the most definitive military treatise is someone all the political scenario mappers and war gamers need to read up on.
The Art of Air Power: Sun Tzu Revisited by Sanu Kainikara.
In authoring the oldest military treatise, titled The Art of War, centuries ago, Chinese strategist Sun Tzu offered an insight into victory and defeat saying: "To secure ourselves against defeat lies in our own hands, but the opportunity of defeating the enemy is provided by the enemy himself.
Chinese philosopher Sun Tzu famously advised that during times of conflict, "build your opponent a golden bridge to retreat across.
Sun Tzu and the Art of Business: Six Strategic Principles for Managers.
Alexander was able to point out that there should have been recognition of another maxim of Sun Tzu, "Go to extreme limits to avoid war.