supply-side economics

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Related to Supply-Side Policy: Monetary policy

supply-side economics

n
(Economics) (functioning as singular) a school of economic thought that emphasizes the importance to a strong economy of policies that remove impediments to supply

supply-side economics

Economic policies based on the idea that a national economy will benefit through a government making more money available for investment, especially through reducing tax levels.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.supply-side economics - the school of economic theory that stresses the costs of production as a means of stimulating the economy; advocates policies that raise capital and labor output by increasing the incentive to produce
economic science, economics, political economy - the branch of social science that deals with the production and distribution and consumption of goods and services and their management
References in periodicals archive ?
If, as Crafts argues, there has been no major structural break in either supply-side policy or growth potential, what explains the unprecedented weakness in productivity since the onset of the crisis?
Active supply-side policy, for instance in the labour market, was used.
7 billion, with 65% of that sum allocated to fund supply-side policy initiatives and 35% allocated toward demand reduction and treatment initiatives.
The current mismatch between skill supply and decent job opportunities reveals the limitations of supply-side policy responses focused on retraining people in isolation from demand-side measures.
The most recent work in this area links housing and employment decisions and includes housing supply, which makes it possible to extend the model to consider supply-side policy to affect open space, habitat protection, and land use within a consistent general equilibrium framework.
He noted that this will require both demand and supply-side policy measures, including support for the development of small-and-medium-sized enterprises.
Basically, they treat the period from 1981 to 2004 as one continuous, 25-year experiment in supply-side policy including Bill Clinton's push for free trade, welfare reform, and spending control (from 1995 to 2000, spending growth was lower than under any president since Calvin Coolidge).