supply-side economics

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supply-side economics

n
(Economics) (functioning as singular) a school of economic thought that emphasizes the importance to a strong economy of policies that remove impediments to supply

supply-side economics

Economic policies based on the idea that a national economy will benefit through a government making more money available for investment, especially through reducing tax levels.
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Noun1.supply-side economics - the school of economic theory that stresses the costs of production as a means of stimulating the economy; advocates policies that raise capital and labor output by increasing the incentive to produce
economic science, economics, political economy - the branch of social science that deals with the production and distribution and consumption of goods and services and their management
References in periodicals archive ?
But while Trump ran as a populist, he has governed as a plutocrat, most recently by endorsing the discredited supply-side theory of taxation that most Republicans still cling to.
Or consider Kristol's two essays on supply-side theory, 1977'S "Toward a 'New' Economics?
The supply-side theory is consistent with the fluid and diverse American religious life that the Pew survey found.
We aren't just told what supply-side theory is; instead, we're taken to the Washington restaurant table where Arthur Laffer first sells his dinner companions--Jude Wanniski, a young Wall Street Journal editorialist, and a gullible but ambitious young Nixon official named Dick Cheney--on its merits.
Whereas the demand-side theories seek to identify those market and governmental failures that make nonprofit organization necessary, the supply-side theory focuses on the motivation of entrepreneurs who choose to found a nonprofit rather than a for-profit firm.
The supply-side theory that many government officials now follow will only cause larger income gaps between upper-and lower-income groups.