surbahar


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surbahar

(ˌsɑːbəˈhɑː)
n
(Instruments) music an Indian stringed instrument, larger than a sitar
References in periodicals archive ?
Tenders are invited for Supply and fixing furniture for new Rooms at Hotel Surbahar Maihar
Spending more than seven years in rigorous and isolated training, Shankar mastered the sitar and the surbahar -- another plucked string instrument often described as the bass sitar.
Free admission RED SNAPPER (UK, Warp Records), ONRA (France, All City Records), THE CLONIOUS (Austria, Ubiquity/Affine Records), EXO (Bulgaria, Mirizma, HMSU), MENGEME (Bulgaria), SURBAHAR (Bulgaria, Chill Om Records) Sofia Breathes Music - July 9, Shishman Street.
The earliest reference dates back to Ustad Imdad Khan, a master of sitar and surbahar and the youngest musician to be included is Ustad Zakir Hussain.
El festival constara de dos conciertos principiando con un concierto vocal de Pandit Ajoy Chakrobarty y dos musicos tradicionales, seguidos por un concierto instrumental encabezado por Ustad Imrat Khan en la citara y el surbahar.
So my voice was very good and I was singing very well, but the surbahar was always there, and my mother always reminded me that "You have to play surbahar.
Surbahar is one step more refined from the been, because although the been is a fantastic instrument, it's a very beautiful instrument, been was always much more an instrument of self expression.
Surbahar is produced from the been, but it has developed much more practical aspects, because now the meend, which is the slurring part, is developed much more.
So the instrument had to be brought into a new dimension, which was done by my great grandfather Ustad Sahebdad Khan on surbahar.
But you see, it is a musical concept, it's a sound which is very attractive, and perhaps to match the dignity of the musical imagination the surbahar is necessary.
The surbahar is such a fantastic instrument that all these sympathetic notes and counternotes come so beautifully, and actually our ear is not powerful enough to hear all that, but if you really put your ear onto the tumba (gourd) or bridge of the surbahar, you can really go on listening to the miracle of music which is there.
When you play surbahar, do you hear all of those harmonics all of the time?