surtitles


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Related to surtitles: Supertitles

surtitles

(ˈsɜːˌtaɪtəlz)
pl n
1. (Classical Music) brief translations of the text of an opera or play that is being sung or spoken in a foreign language, projected above the stage
Translations

surtitles

[ˈsɜːrtaɪtəlz] nplsurtitres mpl
References in periodicals archive ?
Greek performances are presented with English surtitles and foreign performances with Greek and English surtitles.
While he was a full professor and distinguished artist-in-residence at the Cincinnati Conservatory of Music he performed various roles, including stage direction, production design and surtitles, projection design, adaptation, and English singing translation.
The projected surtitles were too dim and the font too small to be read comfortably.
Both operas are sung in Italian with English surtitles.
They weaved their way around the chairs, used the wings, interacted with the players and were so effective in communicating through song and gesture the surtitles were hardly required.
With surtitles above the stage, there's no need to be fluent in Italian.
Most importantly, while at the Canadian Opera Company, Mansouri invented surtitles, the practice of projecting lyrics in the audience's native language onto screens flanking the stage so that viewers could understand performances often sung in German or Italian.
One thing that bothered me was that without the surtitles (provided in both English and Arabic), the opera would have been difficult to understand as the acting wasn't clear enough.
Grzegorz Jarzyna's version of the Scottish tragedy - in Polish with surtitles - is set in a contemporary and brutal middle-eastern conflict violence and audiences can expect pyrotechnics, immersive video and an extraordinary soundscape, all helping to create the feeling of a theatrical film.
The School for Fathers, sung in Italian with English surtitles, is directed by Bernard Rozet and Vasily Petrenko will conduct.
Microscopic surtitles (translating the libretto into English) required vigorous squinting by those not privileged with perfect eyesight or orchestra seats.
Most plays are performed in Spanish with English surtitles, but some are also produced in English with surtitles in Spanish.