Swaggy

Swag´gy


a.1.Inclined to swag; sinking, hanging, or leaning by its weight.
References in periodicals archive ?
Part rapper and part singer, she's beautiful, talented, swaggy, and fluent in English due to a youth spent in international schools.
At one point, during the interview Bieber shouts: "I'm 18 years old and I'm a swaggy adult
Downing Street is a sea of 1980s swaggy curtains and has a bathroom designed by Lady Thatcher which has lino.
This Page Six and National Enquirer veteran, who was ousted for her swaggy interests and then canned for testing the boundaries of Rupert's media empire, has found a new home.
A curious item among the acquisitions is a fancy dress shirt worn by Gurney during the 1948 Journalists' Ball, smothered back and front with drawings of characters from Gurney strips--portraits of Bluey and Curley with a Fuzzy-Wuzzy Angel (New Guinea native), a very whiskery swaggy, a large moustached pukka airforce officer, Roy (Mo) Rene from Gurney's first humour strip of 1927, Stiffy and Mo, and caricatures of politicians Ben Chifley, Arthur Caldwell and Billy Hughes.
How they resisted the temptation to hammer home the point and stick a swaggy hat with corks on the croc's head is a mystery.
Our most renowned swaggy even camped beneath one shortly before temptation got the better of him and -- well, you know the story.
Swaggy P seemed to have lost his swag for a moment after he tried to swipe the ball from the Black Mamba during practice, in which he got punished for making such a gamble as it tore a ligament in his right thumb due to Bryant's countermove.
There is a distinct whiff of Laurence Llewelyn-Bowen makeover about it - lots of swaggy curtains, pillars and Botticelli-esque lampshades.
Green said "It is really cool to see you feeling all swaggy up there.