syllabary

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Related to Syllabic writing: alphabetic writing, Consonantal Writing, syllabaries

syl·la·bar·y

 (sĭl′ə-bĕr′ē)
n. pl. syl·la·bar·ies
1. A list of syllables.
2. A set of written characters for a language, each character representing a syllable.

[New Latin syllabārium, from Latin syllaba, syllable; see syllable.]

syllabary

(ˈsɪləbərɪ) or

syllabarium

n, pl -baries or -baria
1. (Linguistics) a table or list of syllables
2. (Letters of the Alphabet (Foreign)) a set of symbols used in certain writing systems, such as one used for Japanese, in which each symbol represents a spoken syllable
[C16: from New Latin syllabārium, from Latin syllaba syllable]

syl•la•bar•y

(ˈsɪl əˌbɛr i)

n., pl. -bar•ies.
a set of written symbols, each of which represents a syllable.
[1580–90; < New Latin syllabārium]

syllabary

1. a table of syllables, as might be used for teaching a language.
2. a system of characters or symbols representing syllables instead of individual sounds. Also syllabarium.
See also: Writing
1. a table of syllables, as might be used for teaching a language.
2. a system of characters or symbols representing syllables instead of individual sounds. Also syllabarium.
See also: Language

Syllabary

 a collection or list of syllables.

syllabary

A set of symbols used for representing syllables, for example in Japanese writing.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.syllabary - a writing system whose characters represent syllablessyllabary - a writing system whose characters represent syllables
script - a particular orthography or writing system
Devanagari, Devanagari script, Nagari, Nagari script - a syllabic script used in writing Sanskrit and Hindi
Translations

syllabary

nSyllabar nt, → Silbentabelle f
References in periodicals archive ?
Despite having his findings brought into question, Knowlton says he will continue to search for sites with syllabic writing in order to prove his theories.
KANA, the Japanese name for syllabic writing, means "he acquired" in Hebrew.
According to him, the Indus script was a logo- syllabic writing system with proto- Dravidian as its underlying language.
To begin with, it would be more accurate to say that Sequoyah, whose "English" name is sometimes given as George Guess, was the first widely-reported non-literate creator of a syllabic writing system.
Extensive use of the syllabary is introduced, with exercises in syllabic writing.