symbiosis

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sym·bi·o·sis

 (sĭm′bē-ō′sĭs, -bī-)
n. pl. sym·bi·o·ses (-sēz)
1. Biology A close, prolonged association between two or more different organisms of different species that may, but does not necessarily, benefit each member.
2. A relationship of mutual benefit or dependence.

[Greek sumbiōsis, companionship, from sumbioun, to live together, from sumbios, living together : sun-, syn- + bios, life; see gwei- in Indo-European roots.]

sym′bi·ot′ic (-ŏt′ĭk), sym′bi·ot′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
sym′bi·ot′i·cal·ly adv.

symbiosis

(ˌsɪmbɪˈəʊsɪs; ˌsɪmbaɪˈəʊsɪs)
n
1. (Biology) a close and usually obligatory association of two organisms of different species that live together, often to their mutual benefit
2. (Sociology) a similar relationship between interdependent persons or groups
[C19: via New Latin from Greek: a living together; see symbiont]
ˌsymbiˈotic, ˌsymbiˈotical adj

sym•bi•o•sis

(ˌsɪm biˈoʊ sɪs, -baɪ-)

n., pl. -ses (-sēz).
1.
a. the living together of two dissimilar organisms, as in mutualism, commensalism, or parasitism.
b. (formerly) mutualism.
2. any interdependent or mutually beneficial relationship between two persons, groups, etc.
[1615–25; < Greek symbíōsis=symbiō-, variant s. of symbioûn to live together (sym- sym- + bioûn to live) + -sis -sis]
sym`bi•ot′ic (-ˈɒt ɪk) sym`bi•ot′i•cal, adj.
sym`bi•ot′i•cal•ly, adv.

sym·bi·o·sis

(sĭm′bē-ō′sĭs)
The close association between two or more different organisms of different species, often but not necessarily benefiting each member.

symbiotic adjective
Did You Know? Two organisms that live together in symbiosis may have one of three kinds of relationships: mutualism, commensalism, or parasitism. The mutualism shown by the rhinoceros and the tickbird benefits both. Riding on the rhino's back, the tickbird eats its fill of the ticks that bother the rhino while the rhino gets warning calls from the bird when it senses danger. In commensalism, one member benefits and the other is unaffected. Certain barnacles attach themselves to whales, gaining a safe home and transportation to food-rich waters. But the whales are generally unaffected by the barnacles' presence. In parasitism, though, one species generally gets hurt, as when fleas infest a dog's coat and feed on its blood.

symbiosis

a relationship or association between two or more organisms that is harmful to none of them. — symbiotic, adj.
See also: Organisms
the living together of two dissimilar organisms; the relationship may be beneficial to both (mutualism and symbiosis), beneficial to one without effect on the other (commensalism), beneficial to one and detrimental to the other (parasitism), detrimental to the first without any effect on the other (amensalism), or detrimental to both (synnecrosis). — symbiotic, adj.
See also: Biology

symbiosis

The living together of two organisms from different species for mutual benefit.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.symbiosis - the relation between two different species of organisms that are interdependent; each gains benefits from the other
interdependence, interdependency, mutuality - a reciprocal relation between interdependent entities (objects or individuals or groups)
trophobiosis - a symbiotic relation in which one organism protects the other in return for some kind of food product
Translations

symbiosis

[ˌsɪmbɪˈəʊsɪs] Nsimbiosis f

symbiosis

[ˌsɪmbaɪˈəʊsɪs] n
(between organisms)symbiose f
(between people, organizations, systems)symbiose f

symbiosis

nSymbiose f

symbiosis

[ˌsɪmbɪˈəʊsɪs] nsimbiosi f inv

sym·bi·o·sis

n. simbiosis, unión estrecha de dos organismos que pertenecen a especies diferentes.

symbiosis

n (psych, etc.) simbiosis f
References in periodicals archive ?
To summarise, it is shown that innovation, the endogenous creation of new knowledge in the ecosystem, emerges from six key symbiotic relationships.
The author, botany curator emeritus at the Field Museum in Chicago, also describes genetically diverse species and the symbiotic relationships between plants and fungi, pollinators, and seed-dispersing animals.
This morsel of information points to the provocative subtexts and symbiotic relationships in images created with impressive sleight of hand.
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In pas de deux with Wendy Whelan in Episodes and with Miranda Weese in Symphony in Three Movements, his strength complemented theirs, creating symbiotic relationships that heightened the physical drama inherent in these intricate dances.
Endowed with vitality and the capacity for reciprocity, she can enjoy dynamic symbiotic relationships with others, and experience the vast possibilities of human love, be they ecstatic or painful.
The disciplines studied across these broad headings range from laboratory-based biological sciences to studio-based design, with a shared ambition of finding symbiotic relationships between what have traditionally been regarded as heterogeneous subject areas.
Another area of interest is the effect of fire on underground fungi that have symbiotic relationships with trees, helping them to obtain water and nutrients while gaining carbohydrates.
The analysis presented in the Service reveals the symbiotic relationships between some connectivity solutions, and contrasts them to those areas in which they will compete with each other.
ANCIENT ORIGINS Scientists suspect that at least two different viruses independently developed symbiotic relationships with parasitoid wasps.
Their symbiotic relationships, however, provide value to each of the other business units.
Ectomycorrhizal fungi--literally, fungi that envelop roots--form symbiotic relationships with trees.