Symbological


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Sym`bo`log´i`cal


a.1.Pertaining to a symbology; versed in, or characterized by, symbology.
References in periodicals archive ?
Fogleman mines an impressive variety of neglected symbological genres to support this interpretation, but his readings are forced and inaccurate in a number of cases.
The symbological data is encoded in a series of "layers" that circle around a bulls-eye pattern.
Yes, said Duncan, the Guinness globe behind his head like a black moone, it's a matter of what attitude Poetry assumes before the social order: if one takes the latter as primary field, then one is scaffolded from within, ipso facto, by a closely spaced lattice of symbological struts; but if the social structure is made a small thing, something that can fit inside one's head, well, the area of poeisis suddenly becomes infinite and free.
In his school's symbological system, the crow represented change, something new and good.
In a study of ritual meanings in Vanuatu, Michael Allen (1988) rejects symbological approaches to the subject, charging that they ignore the power dimension and suppose that ritual operates, cryptologically, to `communicate ideas, meanings, messages, or knowledge of social import' (p.