synaxarion


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synaxarion

(ˌsɪnəkˈsɛərɪən)
n, pl -ria (-rɪə)
(Eastern Church (Greek & Russian Orthodox)) (in the Greek Orthodox Church) a public reading on the life of a saint
References in periodicals archive ?
The Holy Synaxarion says that the Holy Family took a route that was not part of the trade routes between Egypt and Palestine at the time, in fear of Herod's oppression in this flight of escape.
In addition to these three core texts, Goehring also draws from the Copto-Arabic Synaxarion, which is included in translation in this book.
Chapter 4 ("Related Texts") provides a translation by Mehdi Aminrazavi of the relevant sections of the Copto-Arabic Synaxarion and Kuhn's translation of the sections of the Panegyric on Apollo 10, which both provide further information about Abraham of Farshut.
The narrative of Theognosta and the conversion of Yemen that appears in John of Nikiu's Chronicle and, with slight variations, in the later Copto-Arabic Synaxarion, bears obvious similarities to accounts of Iberia's female captive.
Studies of Rhipsime tend to focus on her appearance in the synaxarion or later Armenian tradition.
Karpov has also included an appendix with early East Slavic texts of the Memorial and Encomium for Prince Vladimir by Monk Iakov and a Prolog or synaxarion life of Vladimir, based on earlier publications by I.
3) The two major festivals of the archangel in the Synaxarion occur on the days of 12 Paone and 12 Hathor.
Theognosta in the later Copto-Arabic Synaxarion, containing biographies of saints and martyrs for each day of the year, first compiled in the ninth century based on earlier texts, also connects the captive woman with the western Roman emperor, Honorius.
But there are important major papers, too: from the final section, Gerhard Podskalsky's hard-hitting reflections on the relevance of Eastern Orthodox theology to modern Western theology, and Dorothea Wendebourg's important analysis of Florovsky's use of `pseudo-morphosis', a mineralogical term borrowed immediately from Spengler, to characterize Orthodox theology from the sixteenth to the twentieth century; and from the section on Institutions and Social Structures, Angeliki Laiou's discussion of the Church's involvement, in theory and in practice, in economic matters, and the late Alexander Kazhdan's magisterial discussion of the social history revealed by the synaxarion of Constantinople.
On the one hand, certainly she would have been known to be a deaconess since that information was contained in the menaion and synaxarion (171) accounts of her life (she must have been familiar to the monks for them to have commemorated her on the wall of the church, although she might have been included because a relative of the founder or other monk shared the same name).
St Fantinus the Younger, so styled to distinguish him from an older Fantinus of Tauriana (the latter of uncertain date but certainly earlier than the ninth century), had previously been known only from a short notice in the Constantinopolitan Synaxarion under 14 November and several mentions in the Life of St Nilus of Rossano.