synteresis


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synteresis

(ˌsɪntəˈriːsɪs) or

synderesis

n
(Theology) theol the function of consciousness that guides one's conduct

synteresis

preventive or preservative treatment or measures; prophylaxis. See also ethics.
See also: Health
the belief or doctrine that the conscience is the repository of the laws of right and wrong. See also health.
See also: Ethics
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References in periodicals archive ?
This can happen unless one's prudent synteresis reins in it.
Grounded in one's innate synteresis, yet in need of constant cultivation, metis is the missing ingredient in Aesop's fable of the ass in the lion's skin, and the reason behind Gracian's endless invites to prudence and caution.
Misunderstanding success within society as the true aim of one's efforts, just as mistaking vain glory for the measure of one's autonomy, is not only the sign of the loss of metis and synteresis, but it also ultimately is the true mark of foolishness.
Like Ames, Hale elsewhere labels the acts of conscience as synteresis (general principle), syneidesis (minor premise), epicrisis (concluding judgment).
In a peculiar interlude, tyrannized by pleonasm, Albioni tries also to stammer out something about "a religion of listening"; there is also, however, a direct quotation from Dalgarno that doesn't seem unworthy of its commentator: "I am at once prey to synteresis and the confessional.
Radically departing from the ancient and medieval conviction that humans possesses a synteresis theobgia, a spark of the divine from which a jumpstart of grace can initiate the pilgrim toward the heavenly journey, Luther affirms that it is God's grace and love which properly order us to God.
senala: "That synteresis out of which the proposition of this
Que la synteresis de la que se extrae la proposicion de
De acuerdo con la terminologia tomasiana, la synteresis es un habitus y la conscientia la aplicacion de los principios de la synteresis, y por lo tanto un acto (cfr.
La concepcion tomasiana de la synteresis esta en simetria con la cosmovision del hombre medieval, en el sentido de que a el lo caracteriza una reiterada afirmacion de la doctrina cristiana, lo que si acaso no cumple, significa una condena.
In a similar vein, the seventeenth-century Protestant casuist William Ames observes that the operation of conscience is tripartite, or syllogistic: "That which doth dictate or giue the proposition is called Synteresis, by the Schoolmen Synderesis.
It is called a synteresis, and that designates both a connection [with God] and an aversion [from all that is not God].