synteresis


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synteresis

(ˌsɪntəˈriːsɪs) or

synderesis

n
(Theology) theol the function of consciousness that guides one's conduct

synteresis

preventive or preservative treatment or measures; prophylaxis. See also ethics.
See also: Health
the belief or doctrine that the conscience is the repository of the laws of right and wrong. See also health.
See also: Ethics
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References in periodicals archive ?
Like Ames, Hale elsewhere labels the acts of conscience as synteresis (general principle), syneidesis (minor premise), epicrisis (concluding judgment).
In a peculiar interlude, tyrannized by pleonasm, Albioni tries also to stammer out something about "a religion of listening"; there is also, however, a direct quotation from Dalgarno that doesn't seem unworthy of its commentator: "I am at once prey to synteresis and the confessional.
Radically departing from the ancient and medieval conviction that humans possesses a synteresis theobgia, a spark of the divine from which a jumpstart of grace can initiate the pilgrim toward the heavenly journey, Luther affirms that it is God's grace and love which properly order us to God.
In a similar vein, the seventeenth-century Protestant casuist William Ames observes that the operation of conscience is tripartite, or syllogistic: "That which doth dictate or giue the proposition is called Synteresis, by the Schoolmen Synderesis.