trivial


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triv·i·al

 (trĭv′ē-əl)
adj.
1. Of little significance or value.
2. Concerned with or involving unimportant matters; superficial: a trivial colleague; a trivial remark.
3. Mathematics
a. Of, relating to, or being the solution of an equation in which every variable is equal to zero.
b. Of, relating to, or being the simplest possible case; self-evident.

[Middle English trivialle, of the trivium (from Medieval Latin triviālis, from trivium, trivium; see trivium) and Latin triviālis, ordinary (from trivium, crossroads).]

triv′i·al·ly adv.
Synonyms: trivial, trifling, paltry, petty, picayune
These adjectives all apply to what is unimportant and of little consequence. Trivial and trifling refer to what is so insignificant as to be utterly commonplace or unremarkable: "Both sides appreciated that behind this apparently trivial matter of naval salutes lay weighty issues of sovereignty at sea" (Simon Schama)."Now he was smitten with compunction, yet irritated that so trifling an omission should be stored up against him after nearly two years of marriage" (Edith Wharton).
Paltry describes what falls so far short of what is required or desired that it arouses contempt: "The mere fact of grave issues in life depending on such paltry things is monstrously ludicrous" (George Gissing).
Petty usually refers to what is of minor or lesser significance: "Religious slurs, temper tantrums, insults, coercion, debt: all petty things, really, irritants—too minor, it would seem, to move five reasonable people to murder" (Donna Tartt).
What is picayune is of negligible value or importance: "Everything was numbers-oriented—better to close out thirty-five picayune cases than go after two quality ones" (Selwyn Raab).
Word History: The word trivial entered Middle English with senses quite different from its most common contemporary ones. We find in a work from 1432-50 mention of the "arte trivialle," an allusion to the three liberal arts that made up the trivium, the lower division of the seven liberal arts taught in medieval universities—grammar, rhetoric, and logic. The history of trivial goes back to the Latin word trivium, formed from the prefix tri-, "three," and via, "road." Trivium thus meant "the meeting place of three roads, especially as a place of public resort." The publicness of such a place also gave the word a pejorative sense that we express in the phrase the gutter, as in "His manners were formed in the gutter." The Latin adjective triviālis, derived from trivium, thus meant "appropriate to the street corner, commonplace, vulgar." Trivial is first recorded in English with a sense identical to that of triviālis in 1589. Shortly after that trivial is recorded in the sense most familiar to us, "of little importance or significance," making it a word now used of things less weighty than grammar, rhetoric, and logic.

trivial

(ˈtrɪvɪəl)
adj
1. of little importance; petty or frivolous: trivial complaints.
2. ordinary or commonplace; trite: trivial conversation.
3. (Mathematics) maths (of the solutions of a set of homogeneous equations) having zero values for all the variables
4. (Biology) biology denoting the specific name of an organism in binomial nomenclature
5. (Biology) biology chem denoting the popular name of an organism or substance, as opposed to the scientific one
6. (Historical Terms) of or relating to the trivium
[C15: from Latin triviālis belonging to the public streets, common, from trivium crossroads, junction of three roads, from tri- + via road]
ˈtrivially adv
ˈtrivialness n

triv•i•al

(ˈtrɪv i əl)

adj.
1. of very little importance or value; insignificant.
2. commonplace; ordinary.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Latin triviālis commonplace =trivi(um) place where three roads meet, public place (tri- tri- + -vium, derivative of via road) + -ālis -al1]
triv′i•al•ism, n.
triv′i•al•ist, n.
triv′i•al•ly, adv.
syn: See petty.

trivial

  • folderol - Trivial or nonsensical fuss, nonsense, or a useless trifle.
  • nugacious, nugatory - Nugacious and nugatory are synonyms for trivial.
  • pelsy - Means "trivial, trashy, of little value."
  • psilology - A love of trivial or vacuous talk.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.trivial - (informal) small and of little importance; "a fiddling sum of money"; "a footling gesture"; "our worries are lilliputian compared with those of countries that are at war"; "a little (or small) matter"; "a dispute over niggling details"; "limited to petty enterprises"; "piffling efforts"; "giving a police officer a free meal may be against the law, but it seems to be a picayune infraction"
colloquialism - a colloquial expression; characteristic of spoken or written communication that seeks to imitate informal speech
unimportant - not important; "a relatively unimportant feature of the system"; "the question seems unimportant"
2.trivial - of little substance or significancetrivial - of little substance or significance; "a few superficial editorial changes"; "only trivial objections"
unimportant, insignificant - devoid of importance, meaning, or force
3.trivial - concerned with trivialitiestrivial - concerned with trivialities; "a trivial young woman"; "a trivial mind"
frivolous - not serious in content or attitude or behavior; "a frivolous novel"; "a frivolous remark"; "a frivolous young woman"

trivial

adjective unimportant, little, small, minor, slight, everyday, petty, meaningless, commonplace, worthless, trifling, insignificant, negligible, frivolous, paltry, incidental, puny, inconsequential, trite, inconsiderable, valueless, nickel-and-dime (U.S. slang), wanky (taboo slang), chickenshit (U.S. slang) I don't like to visit the doctor just for something trivial.
important, serious, significant, essential, vital, crucial, unusual, considerable, profound, worthwhile, uncommon, weighty
Quotations
"What mighty contests rise from trivial things" [Alexander Pope The Rape of the Lock]

trivial

adjective
Translations
bezvýznamnýtriviálnídruhovýpovrchní
triviel
arginetavalinetühine
mitätöntavallinentriviaalivähäpätöinenyksinkertainen
trivijalan
igénytelen
smávægileguryfirborîslegur, léttúîugur
些細な自明な蛇足の通称ありふれた
사소한
nepomemben
trivial
ไม่สำคัญ
önemsizönemsiz ayrıntılarla ilgilenendeğersiz
ít quan trọng

trivial

[ˈtrɪvɪəl] ADJ [details, matter] → trivial, banal; [person] → frívolo; [sum] → insignificante, nimio
I found it all rather trivialme parecía todo muy trivial

trivial

[ˈtrɪviəl] adj [details, matter, problem, offence, film, conversation] → insignifiant(e)

trivial

adj
trivial; objection, loss, details, mattersgeringfügig, belanglos, trivial; mistakebelanglos; look, your health is not something trivialhör mal, mit der Gesundheit ist nicht zu spaßen!; the trivial rounddas triviale Einerlei
personoberflächlich

trivial

[ˈtrɪvɪəl] adj (matter) → futile; (excuse, comment) → banale; (amount) → irrisorio/a; (mistake) → di poco conto

trivia

(ˈtriviə) noun plural
unimportant matters or details. I haven't time to worry about such trivia.
ˈtrivial adjective
1. of very little importance. trivial details.
2. (especially of people) only interested in unimportant things; not at all serious. She's a very trivial person.
ˈtrivially adverb
ˌtriviˈality (-ˈa-) noun
1. the state of being trivial.
2. (plural triviˈalities) something which is trivial. He is always worrying about some triviality or other.

trivial

تَافِه triviální triviel trivial τετριμμένος trivial vähäpätöinen trivial trivijalan insignificante 些細な 사소한 triviaal triviell błahy trivial тривиальный trivial ไม่สำคัญ önemsiz ít quan trọng 微不足道的
References in classic literature ?
Even our digestion is governed by angels," said Blake; and if you will resist the trivial inclination to substitute "bad angels," is there really any greater mystery than the process by which beef is turned into brains, and beer into beauty?
This had jarred upon him then, and now her trivial cares and anxieties jarred upon him several times.
IT IS a trivial grammar-school text, but yet worthy a wise man's consideration.
There had been, he admitted, a trivial blemish or so in its rate of progress, but this was exaggerated and had been entirely owing to the "parsimony of the public," which guilty public, it appeared, had been until lately bent in the most determined manner on by no means enlarging the number of Chancery judges appointed--I believe by Richard the Second, but any other king will do as well.
Again, the indolent reader, as well as spectator, finds great advantage from both these; for, as they are not obliged either to see the one or read the others, and both the play and the book are thus protracted, by the former they have a quarter of an hour longer allowed them to sit at dinner, and by the latter they have the advantage of beginning to read at the fourth or fifth page instead of the first, a matter by no means of trivial consequence to persons who read books with no other view than to say they have read them, a more general motive to reading than is commonly imagined; and from which not only law books, and good books, but the pages of Homer and Virgil, of Swift and Cervantes, have been often turned over.
If her conversation was light and trivial, it was amusing, and she was never at a loss for something to say, or for suitable words to express it in.
Strutting about with great show and braggadocio, he strove to impress his followers with the mere nothingness of so trivial a feat as flying birdlike thousands of yards above the jungle, though it was long until he had thoroughly convinced himself by the force of autosuggestion that he had enjoyed every instant of the flight and was already far advanced in the art of aviation.
As I was leaving the Irishman's roof after the rain, bending my steps again to the pond, my haste to catch pickerel, wading in retired meadows, in sloughs and bog-holes, in forlorn and savage places, appeared for an instant trivial to me who had been sent to school and college; but as I ran down the hill toward the reddening west, with the rainbow over my shoulder, and some faint tinkling sounds borne to my ear through the cleansed air, from I know not what quarter, my Good Genius seemed to say -- Go fish and hunt far and wide day by day -- farther and wider -- and rest thee by many brooks and hearth-sides without misgiving.
I returned to the hotel at Welmingham so jaded in body and mind, so weakened and depressed by all that I had gone through, as to be quite unfit to endure the local gossip about the inquest, and to answer the trivial questions that the talkers addressed to me in the coffee-room.
You may imagine the young people brushed up after the labours of the day, and making this novelty, as they would make any novelty, the excuse for walking together and enjoying a trivial flirtation.
The more trivial sort imitated the actions of meaner persons, at first composing satires, as the former did hymns to the gods and the praises of famous men.
We all stand waiting, empty,--knowing, possibly, that we can be full, surrounded by mighty symbols which are not symbols to us, but prose and trivial toys.