tuna


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tu·na 1

 (to͞o′nə, tyo͞o′-)
n. pl. tuna or tu·nas
1.
a. Any of various often large scombroid marine food and game fishes of the genus Thunnus and related genera, several of which, including albacore and skipjack tuna, are commercially important sources of canned fish. Also called tunny.
b. Any of several related fishes, such as the bonito.
2. The edible flesh of tuna, often canned or processed. Also called tuna fish.

[American Spanish, from Spanish atún, from Arabic at-tūn, the tuna, from Latin thunnus; see tunny.]

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tuna2

tu·na 2

 (to͞o′nə, tyo͞o′-)
n.
1. Any of several prickly pears, especially O. ficus-indica, widely cultivated for its edible red fruit.
2. The edible fruit of any of these cacti. Also called cactus pear.

[American Spanish, from Taíno.]

tuna

(ˈtjuːnə)
n, pl -na or -nas
1. (Animals) Also called: tunny any of various large marine spiny-finned fishes of the genus Thunnus, esp T. thynnus, chiefly of warm waters: family Scombridae. They have a spindle-shaped body and widely forked tail, and are important food fishes
2. (Animals) any of various similar and related fishes
[C20: from American Spanish, from Spanish atún, from Arabic tūn, from Latin thunnus tunny, from Greek]

tuna

(ˈtjuːnə)
n
1. (Plants) any of various tropical American prickly pear cacti, esp Opuntia tuna, that are cultivated for their sweet edible fruits
2. (Plants) the fruit of any of these cacti
[C16: via Spanish from Taino]

tu•na1

(ˈtu nə, ˈtyu-)

n., pl. (esp. collectively) -na, (esp. for kinds or species) -nas.
1. any of several large marine food and game fishes of the family Scombridae, including the albacore, bluefin tuna, and yellowfin tuna.
2. any of various related fishes.
3. Also called tu′na fish`. the flesh of the tuna, used as food.
[1880–85, Amer.; < American Spanish, variant of Sp atún < Arabic al the + tūn < Greek thýnnos tunny]

tu•na2

(ˈtu nə, ˈtyu-)

n., pl. -nas.
1. any of various prickly pears, esp. either of two erect, treelike species, Opuntia tuna or O. ficus-indica, of Mexico, bearing a sweet, edible fruit.
2. the fruit of these plants.
[1545–55; < Sp < Taino]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tuna - tropical American prickly pear of Jamaicatuna - tropical American prickly pear of Jamaica
prickly pear, prickly pear cactus - cacti having spiny flat joints and oval fruit that is edible in some species; often used as food for stock
2.tuna - important warm-water fatty fish of the genus Thunnus of the family Scombridaetuna - important warm-water fatty fish of the genus Thunnus of the family Scombridae; usually served as steaks
tunny, tuna - any very large marine food and game fish of the genus Thunnus; related to mackerel; chiefly of warm waters
saltwater fish - flesh of fish from the sea used as food
albacore - relatively small tuna with choice white flesh; major source of canned tuna
bonito - flesh of mostly Pacific food fishes of the genus Sarda of the family Scombridae; related to but smaller than tuna
bluefin, bluefin tuna - flesh of very large tuna
3.tuna - any very large marine food and game fish of the genus Thunnustuna - any very large marine food and game fish of the genus Thunnus; related to mackerel; chiefly of warm waters
food fish - any fish used for food by human beings
scombroid, scombroid fish - important marine food and game fishes found in all tropical and temperate seas; some are at least partially endothermic and can thrive in colder waters
genus Thunnus, Thunnus - tunas: warm-blooded fishes
long-fin tunny, Thunnus alalunga, albacore - large pelagic tuna the source of most canned tuna; reaches 93 pounds and has long pectoral fins; found worldwide in tropical and temperate waters
horse mackerel, Thunnus thynnus, bluefin, bluefin tuna - largest tuna; to 1500 pounds; of mostly temperate seas: feed in polar regions but breed in tropics
Thunnus albacares, yellowfin, yellowfin tuna - may reach 400 pounds; worldwide in tropics
tuna fish, tunny, tuna - important warm-water fatty fish of the genus Thunnus of the family Scombridae; usually served as steaks
4.tuna - New Zealand eel
eel - voracious snakelike marine or freshwater fishes with smooth slimy usually scaleless skin and having a continuous vertical fin but no ventral fins
Translations
تُوْنسَمَك التّونلَحْم سَمَك التّون
tuňák
tun
ThunfischKaktusfeige
tonnikala
tuna
tonhal
マグロ
참치
tuna
tonfisk
ปลาทูน่า
cá ngừ

tuna

[ˈtjuːnə] N (tuna, tunas (pl)) (also tuna fish) → atún m

tuna

[ˈtjuːnə] (pl) n (also tuna fish) → thon m

tuna (fish)

nT(h)unfisch m

tuna

[ˈtjuːnə] n pl inv (also tuna fish) → tonno

tuna(-fish)

(ˈtʃuːnə(fiʃ)) , ((American) ˈtu:nə(-)) nounplurals ˈtuna ~ˈtuna-fish, ~ˈtunas also (tunny(-fish) (ˈtani(fiʃ)) plurals ˈtunnies, ~ˈtunny, ~ˈtunny-fish) –
1. a kind of large sea-fish of the mackerel family.
2. its flesh, used as food.

tuna

تُوْن tuňák tun Thunfisch τόνος atún tonnikala thon tuna tonno マグロ 참치 tonijn tunfisk tuńczyk atum тунец tonfisk ปลาทูน่า ton balığı cá ngừ 金枪鱼

tuna

n. [fish] atún.

tuna

n atún m
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The area off the Libyan coast was closed to the exploitation of bluefin tuna by the International Commission on the Conservation of Atlantic Tuna (ICCAT) and the European Union fishing commission, thethe marine wildlife conservation organization said.
Tuna does have mercury, but even young children and nursing, pregnant, or planning-to-be-pregnant women can eat up to 12 ounces of light canned tuna (or 3 oz.
Under the new regulation, the member states will be obliged to require a duly completed statement of catches of bluefin tuna for all quantities of this fish landed in its ports, delivered to or harvested in its fish farms.