taiga

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tai·ga

 (tī′gə)
n.
A subarctic area of northern Eurasia and North America located just south of the tundra and covered largely with coniferous forests dominated by firs and spruces.

[Russian taĭga, from a Turkic source such as Tuvan tayga or Yakut tayğa.]

taiga

(ˈtaɪɡə)
n
(Physical Geography) the coniferous forests extending across much of subarctic North America and Eurasia, bordered by tundra to the north and steppe to the south
[from Russian, of Turkic origin; compare Turkish daǧ mountain]

tai•ga

(ˈtaɪ gə, taɪˈgɑ)

n., pl. -gas.
any of the coniferous evergreen forests of subarctic lands, covering vast areas of N North America and Eurasia.
[1885–90; < Russian taĭgá < a Turkic language]

tai·ga

(tī′gə)
A forest located in the Earth's far northern regions, consisting mainly of cone-bearing evergreens, such as firs, pines, and spruces, and some deciduous trees, such as larches, birches, and aspens. The taiga is found just south of the tundra.

taiga

An area of coniferous evergreen forest lying south of the tundra in Europe and Asia.
Translations
taiga
tajga

taiga

nTaiga f
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References in periodicals archive ?
The taiga in each continent received locally isolated species from the south, and it is these species that are responsible for the regional differences between the faunas of the taigas of North America and Eurasia.
The tree story plays a vital role in the taiga ecosystem.
Another feature of the tree population of virgin taiga forests is the uneven distribution of age classes.
Yet this is only true among the boreal forests in the dark taiga, where each specific area of virgin forest contains the largest possible number of trees.
The denser the tree stand in the taiga, the lower the diversity of the lower layers.
In general, the taiga has a shrub layer under the tree layer.
Almost all the herbaceous plants of the taiga are perennial, including the cowberry (Vaccinium vitisidaea), the bilberry (V.
It is unusual to find a complete cover of lichens in the taiga, because they tend to be restricted to well-lit sites and open forests growing on dry, poor, sandy soils, such as pine forests on sand dunes.
78-79 and 348-352), but only mosses, lichens, and algae grow as epiphytes (plants that grow on other plants instead of soil but are not parasitic) in the taiga.
Sometimes, the subshrub and moss layers in the taiga forest are distributed in patches, in a mosaic pattern.
I rolled up on Monday, and the three Taiga bean geese were easily distinguished, grazing away from the others.
Taiga been geese breed in western Russia and are rare in Britain away from traditional roosts in east Norfolk and central Scotland.