takeover

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Related to Takeovers: Hostile takeovers

take·o·ver

also take-o·ver  (tāk′ō′vər)
n.
1. The act or an instance of assuming control or management of or responsibility for something, especially the seizure of power, as in a nation, political organization, or corporation.
2. The performing of an action or a play in a game again after the first performance has been discounted or is under dispute.

take′o′ver adj.

take•o•ver

(ˈteɪkˌoʊ vər)

n.
1. the act of seizing or appropriating authority or control.
2. the acquisition of a corporation through the purchase or exchange of stock.
[1940–45]

takeover

When one company takes control over another company by buying more than 50% of its shares. This gives it a majority of votes in the election of corporate officers or on corporate policy.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.takeover - a sudden and decisive change of government illegally or by forcetakeover - a sudden and decisive change of government illegally or by force
group action - action taken by a group of people
countercoup - a sudden and decisive overthrow of a government that gained power by a coup d'etat
2.takeover - a change by sale or merger in the controlling interest of a corporation
buyout - acquisition of a company by purchasing a controlling percentage of its stock
hostile takeover - a takeover that is resisted by the management of the target company
friendly takeover - a takeover that is welcomed by the management of the target company

takeover

noun merger, coup, change of leadership, incorporation the proposed takeover of the company
Translations
převzetí
overtagelse
yritysvaltaus
preuzimanje
企業買収
인수
uppköp
การครอบครอง
sự tiếp quản

takeover

[ˈteɪkˌəʊvəʳ]
A. N
1. (Comm) [of company] → adquisición f, compra f
2. (Pol) [of new government] → toma f de posesión; [of new premier] → entrada f en funciones
3. (Mil) (= coup) → toma f del poder
military takeovergolpe m de estado
B. CPD takeover bid Noferta f pública de adquisición (de acciones), OPA f

takeover

[ˈteɪkəʊvər] n
(COMMERCE) [company] → rachat m
(= coup) → coup m d'Étattakeover bid noffre f publique d'achat, OPA f

takeover

[ˈteɪkˌəʊvəʳ] n (Comm) → assorbimento

takeover

اِسْتِلام převzetí overtagelse Übernahme ανάληψη absorción yritysvaltaus rachat preuzimanje acquisizione 企業買収 인수 overname overtakelse przejęcie aquisição de controle, aquisição de controlo переход руководства uppköp การครอบครอง devralma sự tiếp quản 接管
References in periodicals archive ?
The Government is pleased to announce the appointment of four new members to the Takeovers Panel.
BUSINESS Secretary Vince Cable said earlier this month that "we are seeing too many company takeovers which reduce or destroy value and are driven by the fat fees earned by the lawyers and banks who facilitate them.
WEST Midland campaigners have part-won their long-running battle for a new "Cadbury Law" to clampdown on hostile takeovers following Kraft's pounds 11.
I don't like the basics of the plan,'' said Bergan, whose group passed a resolution at its convention earlier this year opposing all mayoral takeovers of school districts.
Under the label "economic patriotism" ad hoc legislation is being prepared on the national level allowing national authorities to veto or impose conditions on foreign takeovers of "strategic assets," facilitating the dispersion of "poison pills" by companies trying to thwart unwelcome takeover bids, or prohibiting mergers with foreign companies (partially) those owned by their governments.
This same price will be offered to all shareholders in a full takeover offer by the Rank Group, in compliance with the New Zealand Takeovers Code.
This study estimates that takeovers by large firms have "destroyed" $226 billion over 20 years.
One emerging strand of more systematic research by Wong and Shen (2001) examines 14 school districts where comprehensive takeovers are in place.
Because account takeovers make up a large percentage of identity theft, several potential authentication techniques appear possible now or in the near future.
Max Harris had led several takeovers in recent years.
Although INDOPCO clarified the law as it pertains to target corporations in successful friendly takeovers, issues remain regarding the deductibility of expenses related to failed or abandoned transactions, expenses related to fighting hostile takeovers, expenses related to searching for white knights, expenses related to divisive reorganizations, expenses related to proxy fights, and costs of obtaining financing to redeem shares to prevent a hostile takeover, among others.
Pennsylvania was a state whose industries had been particularly hard hit in the 1980s by corporate raiders, takeovers, and investment capital.