Talmud


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Tal·mud

 (täl′mo͝od, tăl′məd)
n. Judaism
The collection of ancient Rabbinic writings consisting of the Mishnah and the Gemara, constituting the basis of religious authority in Orthodox Judaism.

[Mishnaic Hebrew talmûd, learning, instruction, from Hebrew lāmad, to learn; see lmd in Semitic roots.]

Tal·mu′dic (täl-mo͞o′dĭk, -myo͞o′-, tăl-), Tal·mu′di·cal (-dĭ-kəl) adj.
Tal′mud·ist (täl′mo͝o-dĭst, tăl′mə-) n.

Talmud

(ˈtælmʊd)
n
1. (Judaism) the primary source of Jewish religious law, consisting of the Mishnah and the Gemara
2. (Judaism) either of two recensions of this compilation, the Palestinian Talmud of about 375 ad, or the longer and more important Babylonian Talmud of about 500 ad
[C16: from Hebrew talmūdh, literally: instruction, from lāmadh to learn]
Talˈmudic, Talˈmudical adj
ˈTalmudism n

Tal•mud

(ˈtɑl mʊd, ˈtæl məd)

n.
1. the collection of Jewish law and tradition consisting of the Mishnah and the Gemara.
2. the Gemara.
[1525–35; < Hebrew talmūdh literally, instruction]
Tal•mud′ic, Tal•mud′i•cal, adj.
Tal′mud•ism, n.

Talmud

With the Tenakh, Judaism’s two most sacred collections of writings. This is a collection of legal and ethical writings, history, and folkore.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Talmud - the collection of ancient rabbinic writings on Jewish law and tradition (the Mishna and the Gemara) that constitute the basis of religious authority in Orthodox JudaismTalmud - the collection of ancient rabbinic writings on Jewish law and tradition (the Mishna and the Gemara) that constitute the basis of religious authority in Orthodox Judaism
Gemara - the second part of the Talmud consisting primarily of commentary on the Mishna
Mishna, Mishnah - the first part of the Talmud; a collection of early oral interpretations of the scriptures that was compiled about AD 200
Translations
Talmude

Talmud

[ˈtælmʊd] NTalmud m

Talmud

nTalmud m

Talmud

[ˈtælmʊd] nTalmud m
References in classic literature ?
I HAD rather believe all the fables in the Legend, and the Talmud, and the Alcoran, than that this universal frame is without a mind.
I swear by the Talmud,'' said the Jew, ``that your valour has been misled in that matter.
Literary critic Adam Kirsch is reading a page of Talmud a day, along with Jews around the world.
Among his topics are in quest of Babylonian Halakha in tannaitic compositions, the legal traditions of Avuha-De-Shmuel, Levi's Baraitot: Tanna D'ei Shmuel, Tannei Shmuel, "Babylonian Baraitot" in the Palestinian Talmud, and Shmuel: a model of Halakhic consistency.
For centuries, studying a page of the Talmud has come with a bevy of barriers to entry.
Joseph Skibell shifts his incisive gaze from fiction to the Talmud in Six Memos from the Last Millennium, a learned, interdisciplinary dance through Judaism's theological legal canon.
Some of these discrepancies between Ezekiel and the Torah are discussed in the Talmud (TB Menahot 45a), which resolves them by offering exegetical reinterpretations of three of the passages in Ezekiel.
When during the 13th century Christian theologians started to examine and translate the Talmud from Hebrew and Aramaic into Latin, they were faced with a huge body of texts which represented centuries of legalistic and homiletic materials.
Indeed, close to the end of his short book on this immense subject (millions of words in 37 volumes), he informs us that "the Talmud is no longer the exclusive property of the religious .
He has devoted his life to making the Talmud accessible to all Jews.
The Talmud tells us that Scripture and the Oral Law were given at Sinai and complement each other (TALMUD Brakhot 5a on EXODUS 24:12).
The open past; subjectivity and remembering in the Talmud.