Talmud


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Talmud: Torah

Tal·mud

 (täl′mo͝od, tăl′məd)
n. Judaism
The collection of ancient Rabbinic writings consisting of the Mishnah and the Gemara, constituting the basis of religious authority in Orthodox Judaism.

[Mishnaic Hebrew talmûd, learning, instruction, from Hebrew lāmad, to learn; see lmd in Semitic roots.]

Tal·mu′dic (täl-mo͞o′dĭk, -myo͞o′-, tăl-), Tal·mu′di·cal (-dĭ-kəl) adj.
Tal′mud·ist (täl′mo͝o-dĭst, tăl′mə-) n.

Talmud

(ˈtælmʊd)
n
1. (Judaism) the primary source of Jewish religious law, consisting of the Mishnah and the Gemara
2. (Judaism) either of two recensions of this compilation, the Palestinian Talmud of about 375 ad, or the longer and more important Babylonian Talmud of about 500 ad
[C16: from Hebrew talmūdh, literally: instruction, from lāmadh to learn]
Talˈmudic, Talˈmudical adj
ˈTalmudism n

Tal•mud

(ˈtɑl mʊd, ˈtæl məd)

n.
1. the collection of Jewish law and tradition consisting of the Mishnah and the Gemara.
2. the Gemara.
[1525–35; < Hebrew talmūdh literally, instruction]
Tal•mud′ic, Tal•mud′i•cal, adj.
Tal′mud•ism, n.

Talmud

With the Tenakh, Judaism’s two most sacred collections of writings. This is a collection of legal and ethical writings, history, and folkore.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Talmud - the collection of ancient rabbinic writings on Jewish law and tradition (the Mishna and the Gemara) that constitute the basis of religious authority in Orthodox JudaismTalmud - the collection of ancient rabbinic writings on Jewish law and tradition (the Mishna and the Gemara) that constitute the basis of religious authority in Orthodox Judaism
Gemara - the second part of the Talmud consisting primarily of commentary on the Mishna
Mishna, Mishnah - the first part of the Talmud; a collection of early oral interpretations of the scriptures that was compiled about AD 200
Translations
Talmude

Talmud

[ˈtælmʊd] NTalmud m

Talmud

nTalmud m

Talmud

[ˈtælmʊd] nTalmud m
References in classic literature ?
I swear by the Talmud,'' said the Jew, ``that your valour has been misled in that matter.
I HAD rather believe all the fables in the Legend, and the Talmud, and the Alcoran, than that this universal frame is without a mind.
The first twenty-two volumes of the new Koren Talmud Bavli with Rabbi Steinsaltz's English translation and commentary are now available.
It should be noted that commentaries from the Mishnah and the Talmud to present- day interpretations are included.
Reading the Talmud in a most unlikely place - Iran's holy city
But as Daniel Boyarin writes in "A Traveling Homeland: The Babylonian Talmud as Diaspora", diaspora may be more constructively construed as a form of cultural hybridity or a mode of analysis.
When during the 13th century Christian theologians started to examine and translate the Talmud from Hebrew and Aramaic into Latin, they were faced with a huge body of texts which represented centuries of legalistic and homiletic materials.
Indeed, close to the end of his short book on this immense subject (millions of words in 37 volumes), he informs us that "the Talmud is no longer the exclusive property of the religious .
It cites the Hebrew Bible, and Talmud, and the Midrash in the course of identifying humor in these writings, instances of irony, and examples of early humor and how they relate to contemporary Jewish culture and jokes.
Our correspondent reported that groups of Israeli settlers accompanied by Israeli Forces raided the compound this morning, in order to host tours in the compound and perform Talmud prayers.
He then amasses sources from the Talmud through the medieval Sages who, at least partially, accept certain aspects of both lower criticism (textual emendation) and higher criticism (authorship).
Contributions may be made in his memory to: Talmud Torah of Hevron Israel; or Hevra Kadisha of Houston; or Kiviti HaShem and Shiviti HaShem Synagogues in Ofakim, Israel.