Tartary

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Tar·ta·ry

 (tär′tə-rē) or Ta·ta·ry (tä′-)
A vast region of eastern Europe and northern Asia controlled by the Mongols in the 1200s and 1300s. It extended as far east as the Pacific Ocean under the rule of Genghis Khan.

Tartary

(ˈtɑːtərɪ)
n
(Placename) a variant spelling of Tatary

Ta•ta•ry

(ˈtɑ tə ri)

also Tartary



n.
a historic region of indefinite extent in E Europe and Asia: designates the area overrun by the Tartars in the Middle Ages, from the Dnieper River to the Pacific.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Tartary - the vast geographical region of Europe and Asia that was controlled by the Mongols in the 13th and 14th centuries; "under Genghis Khan Tartary extended as far east as the Pacific Ocean"
Asia - the largest continent with 60% of the earth's population; it is joined to Europe on the west to form Eurasia; it is the site of some of the world's earliest civilizations
Europe - the 2nd smallest continent (actually a vast peninsula of Eurasia); the British use `Europe' to refer to all of the continent except the British Isles
Translations

Tartary

[ˈtɑːtərɪ] NTartaria f

Tartary

nTatarei f
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References in periodicals archive ?
They propagated Crambe tataria, an "endangered species" in Italy, in order to protect them under ex situ conditions.
The photo band includes workers from Moscow, Tataria, Dagestan, Kalymykia, the Tungus river district, and two from Uzbekistan.
He moved to Tataria, where he worked on the construction of the "KamAZ" (Kama Car Plant) in a carpentry and concrete brigade.
About Balakhany tier as the part of Tataria Pliocene // News of USSR AS Kazan Branch.
Peng PD, Spain DA, Tataria M, Hellinger JC, Rubin GD, Brundage ST.
It includes a huge 1711 panorama of Moscow, a 1656 map showing "the procession of Muscovites," a 1662 map of the north Dvina River, described as the only waterway into Muscovite; and two rare 1570 and 1606 maps of Tataria, or Tatar, basically the Mongol Empire.
tataria in Turkey (Korotyaev & Gultekin 2003; Gultekin 2007).