Taylor


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Taylor

, Cecil Percival Born 1929.
American pianist and composer who was a leader of the free jazz movement of the 1960s, which emphasized unrestrained, often dissonant improvisation.

Taylor

, Charles McArthur Ghankay Born 1948.
Liberian political leader whose tenure as president of Liberia (1997-2003) was marked by widespread conflict and rebellion. In 2012, an international criminal court found him guilty of war crimes committed in Sierra Leone.

Taylor

, Edward 1642?-1729.
English-born American Puritan cleric and metaphysical poet. His works, unpublished until 1939, include "God's Determinations Touching His Elect" (c. 1685).

Taylor

, Dame Elizabeth Rosemond 1932-2011.
British-born American actress. A childhood star after her appearance in National Velvet (1944), she later won an Academy Award for BUtterfield 8 (1960) and for Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1966).

Taylor

, Frederick Winslow 1856-1915.
American inventor, engineer, and efficiency expert noted for his innovations in industrial engineering and management.

Taylor

, Paul Born 1930.
American choreographer whose avant-garde work includes Three Epitaphs (1956) and Orbs (1966).

Taylor

, Zachary Known as "Old Rough and Ready." 1784-1850.
The 12th president of the United States (1849-1850). An army officer in the Black Hawk War (1832) and the Second Seminole War (1835-1842), he became a national hero during the Mexican War (1846-1848), was elected president (1848), and died in office (1850).

Taylor

(ˈteɪlə)
n
1. (Biography) A(lan) J(ohn) P(ercivale). 1906–90, British historian whose many works include The Origins of the Second World War (1961)
2. (Biography) Brook. 1685–1731, English mathematician, who laid the foundations of differential calculus
3. (Biography) Dame Elizabeth. 1932–2011, US film actress, born in England: films include National Velvet (1944), Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1958), Suddenly Last Summer (1959), and Butterfield 8 (1960) and Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1966), for both of which she won Oscars
4. (Biography) Frederick Winslow. 1856–1915, US engineer, who pioneered the use of time and motion studies to increase efficiency in industry
5. (Biography) Jeremy. 1613–67, English cleric, best known for his devotional manuals Holy Living (1650) and Holy Dying (1651)
6. (Biography) Zachary. 1784–1850, 12th president of the US (1849–50); hero of the Mexican War

Tay•lor

(ˈteɪ lər)

n.
1. (James) Bayard, 1825–78, U.S. poet and travel writer.
2. Jeremy, 1613–67, English prelate and theological writer.
3. Maxwell (Davenport), 1901–87, U.S. army general.
4. Paul (Belville), born 1930, U.S. choreographer.
5. Peter (Hillsman), 1917–94, U.S. short-story writer, novelist, and playwright.
6. Robert Lewis, 1912–98, U.S. biographer, humorist, and newspaperman.
7. Zachary ( “Old Rough and Ready” ), 1784–1850, 12th president of the U.S. 1849–50.
8. a city in SE Michigan. 71,640.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Taylor - United States composer and music critic (1885-1966)Taylor - United States composer and music critic (1885-1966)
2.Taylor - United States film actress (born in England) who was a childhood star; as an adult she often co-starred with Richard Burton (born in 1932)
3.Taylor - 12th President of the United StatesTaylor - 12th President of the United States; died in office (1784-1850)
Translations
References in classic literature ?
was the election of General Taylor to the Presidency.
Bayard Taylor, who could interpret the dim reasonings of animals, and understood their moral natures better than most men, would have found some way to make this poor old chap forget his troubles for a while, but we have not his kindly art, and so had to leave the raven to his griefs.
The want of Miss Taylor would be felt every hour of every day.
Taylor told me of it half an hour ago, and she was told it by a particular friend of Miss Grey herself, else I am sure I should not have believed it; and I was almost ready to sink as it was.
Time out of mind the Raveloe doctor had been a Kimble; Kimble was inherently a doctor's name; and it was difficult to contemplate firmly the melancholy fact that the actual Kimble had no son, so that his practice might one day be handed over to a successor with the incongruous name of Taylor or Johnson.
Livesey, and on him I observed it did not produce an agreeable effect, for he looked up for a moment quite angrily before he went on with his talk to old Taylor, the gardener, on a new cure for the rheumatics.
As he warily moved about, he heard the gen- eral call out irritably: "Tompkins, go over an' see Taylor, an' tell him not t' be in such an all- fired hurry; tell him t' halt his brigade in th' edge of th' woods; tell him t' detach a reg'ment --say I think th' center 'll break if we don't help it out some; tell him t' hurry up.
Madam," answered the rector, in great perplexity, "this strange occurrence brings to my mind a marriage sermon of the famous Bishop Taylor, wherein he mingles so many thoughts of mortality and future woe, that, to speak somewhat after his own rich style, he seems to hang the bridal chamber in black, and cut the wedding garment out of a coffin pall.
Near it lay that bulky volume, the Ductor Dubitantium of Jeremy Taylor, full of cases of conscience, and in which most men, possessed of a conscience, may find something applicable to their purpose.
Van Busche Taylor is the distinguished American critic.
Dorothea knew many passages of Pascal's Pensees and of Jeremy Taylor by heart; and to her the destinies of mankind, seen by the light of Christianity, made the solicitudes of feminine fashion appear an occupation for Bedlam.
Another poet, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, whom William and Dorothy Wordsworth now met, calls her "Wordsworth's exquisite sister.