Teache

(tēch)
n.1.(Sugar Manuf.) Any one of the series of boilers or evaporating pans in which the cane juice is concentrated in making sugar; especially, the last boiler of the series.
2.
References in classic literature ?
I have read ye by what murky light may be mine the lesson that Jonah teaches to all sinners; and therefore to ye, and still more to me, for I am a greater sinner than ye.
This is the way that God teaches us to be meek and patient, and the thought that He has willed it so should rob us of our fears and help us bear the years.
The one with red cheeks is called Miss Smith; she attends to the work, and cuts out--for we make our own clothes, our frocks, and pelisses, and everything; the little one with black hair is Miss Scatcherd; she teaches history and grammar, and hears the second class repetitions; and the one who wears a shawl, and has a pocket- handkerchief tied to her side with a yellow ribband, is Madame Pierrot: she comes from Lisle, in France, and teaches French.
If he does live and that Indian child stays here I'll warrant she teaches him that thewhole orange does not belong to him, as Susan Sowerby says.
or rather I will tax it so far as to require of you the latest news from Palestine, a theme more agreeable to our English ears than the compliments which your French breeding teaches.
They will have it that nature teaches them to love the whole species, and it is reason only that makes a distinction of persons, where there is a superior degree of virtue.
For a long while I did nothing but weep, and would not suffer the genius to come near me; but time teaches us submission, and I have now got accustomed to his presence, and if clothes and jewels could content me, I have them in plenty.
The holy church teaches that thou should'st ne'er laugh an old man to scorn.
Now, in conclusion, the method which teaches adherence to the true order, and an exact enumeration of all the conditions of the thing .
But there is another part of the indictment which says that he teaches men not to receive the gods whom the city receives, and has other new gods.
The proof of this proposition turns upon the greater degree of influence which the State governments if they administer their affairs with uprightness and prudence, will generally possess over the people; a circumstance which at the same time teaches us that there is an inherent and intrinsic weakness in all federal constitutions; and that too much pains cannot be taken in their organization, to give them all the force which is compatible with the principles of liberty.
Experience on a former occasion teaches us not to be too sanguine in such hopes.