Technicolor

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Tech·ni·col·or

 (tĕk′nĭ-kŭl′ər)
A trademark for a method of making color motion pictures in which films sensitive to different primary colors are exposed simultaneously and are later superimposed to produce the full-color print.

Technicolor

(ˈtɛknɪˌkʌlə)
n
(Film) trademark the process of producing colour film by means of superimposing synchronized films of the same scene, each of which has a different colour filter, to obtain the desired mix of colour

Tech•ni•col•or

(ˈtɛk nɪˌkʌl ər)
1. Trademark. a system of making color motion pictures by means of superimposing the three primary colors to produce a final colored print.
2. (often l.c.) flamboyant or lurid, as in color, meaning, or detail.

technicolor

Three films, each sensitive to different colors, run simultaneously in a special camera. Superseded by Eastmancolor, which uses a single film run in a standard camera.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.technicolor - a trademarked method of making color motion pictures
method - a way of doing something, especially a systematic way; implies an orderly logical arrangement (usually in steps)
Translations

Technicolor

® [ˈteknɪˌkʌləʳ]
A. Ntecnicolor ® m
in Technicoloren tecnicolor
B. ADJen tecnicolor, de tecnicolor

Technicolor®

nTechnicolor® nt

Technicolor

® [ˈtɛknɪˌkʌləʳ]
1. nTechnicolor ® m
2. adj (fam) → in technicolor
a Technicolor sunset → un tramonto in technicolor
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References in periodicals archive ?
Hess and Dabholkar describe, in great detail, the emergence of the Technicolor Corporation in 1918, the "tricks" such as 3-D imagery, widescreen, and stereophonic sound, and other largely unsuccessful gimmicks that were being tested in order to differentiate the movie going experience from the small screen and, it was hoped, stem bleeding ticket sales.
degrees in physics from the University of California, Los Angeles, and his first industry job was as a research physicist at Technicolor Corporation in 1951.