telomere

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tel·o·mere

 (tĕl′ə-mîr′, tē′lə-)
n.
Either of the sections of DNA occurring at the ends of a chromosome.

telomere

(ˈtɛləˌmɪə)
n
(Genetics) genetics either of the ends of a chromosome
[C20: from Greek telos end + meros part]

tel•o•mere

(ˈtɛl əˌmɪər, ˈti lə-)
n.
the segment of DNA that occurs at the ends of chromosomes.
[1935–40]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.telomere - either (free) end of a eukaryotic chromosome; "telomeres act as caps to keep the sticky ends of chromosomes from randomly clumping together"
chromosome - a threadlike strand of DNA in the cell nucleus that carries the genes in a linear order; "humans have 22 chromosome pairs plus two sex chromosomes"
end, terminal - either extremity of something that has length; "the end of the pier"; "she knotted the end of the thread"; "they rode to the end of the line"; "the terminals of the anterior arches of the fornix"
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
A study conducted before and after the 2004 closure of a coal-burning power plant in Tongliang, China, found children born before the closure had shorter telomeres than those conceived and born after the plant stopped polluting the air, Medicalxpress reported.
Investigators from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania found that stem cells in the muscles of muscular dystrophy patients may, at an early age, lose their ability to regenerate new muscle, due to shortened telomeres.
A team of University of Pittsburgh researchers uncovered new details about the biology of telomeres, "caps" of DNA that protect the tips of chromosomes and play key roles in a number of health conditions, including cancer, inflammation and aging.
Telomeres, composed of repeated sequences of DNA, are shortened every time a cell divides and therefore become smaller as a person ages.
According to a study from Japan, alcohol can damage telomeres, the protective ends of our DNA; shortened telomeres are linked to cellular aging, and could also raise your risk for certain diseases.
A team of researchers led by Dr Dennis Kappei, a Special Fellow from the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore (CSI Singapore) at the National University of Singapore (NUS), has discovered the role of the protein ZBTB48 in regulating both telomeres and mitochondria, which are key players involved in cellular ageing.
Researchers from Cardiff University's School of Medicine showed that measuring sections of DNA called telomeres is a highly accurate indicator of how disease will progress in patients with the bone marrow cancer myeloma and pre-leukaemia myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) - a bone marrow disorder often leading to life-threatening bone marrow failure and even acute myeloid leukaemia (AML).
The researchers assessed the relationship between polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), a "ubiquitous" air pollutant caused by motor vehicle exhaust; and shortening of telomeres, a type of DNA damage typically associated with aging.
The study finds that people who have consistently high levels of physical activity have obviously longer telomeres than those who have sedentary lifestyles, as well as those who are moderately active.
If you want to live longer, take good care of your telomeres," the Washington Post told readers earlier this year.
Shorter telomeres have been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and other age-related conditions.
Scientists think that shorter telomeres are a sign of shorter lifespan.

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