temple


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tem·ple 1

 (tĕm′pəl)
n.
1.
a. A building dedicated to religious ceremonies or worship.
b. Temple Either of two successive buildings in ancient Jerusalem serving as the primary center for Jewish worship.
c. Judaism A synagogue, especially of a Reform congregation.
d. Mormon Church A building in which the sacred ordinances are administered.
2. Something regarded as having within it a divine presence.
3. A building used for meetings by any of several fraternal orders, such as the Freemasons.
4. A building reserved for a highly valued function: the library, a temple of learning.
5. Temple Either of two groups of buildings in London, the Inner Temple and the Middle Temple, that house two of the four Inns of Court and that occupy the site of a complex used by the medieval Knights Templars.

[Middle English, from Old English tempel, from Latin templum; see tem- in Indo-European roots.]

tem·ple 2

 (tĕm′pəl)
n.
1. The flat region on either side of the forehead.
2. Either of the sidepieces of a frame for eyeglasses that extends along the temple and over the ear.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Vulgar Latin *tempula, from Latin tempora, pl. of tempus, temple of the head.]

tem·ple 3

 (tĕm′pəl)
n.
A device in a loom that keeps the cloth stretched to the correct width during weaving.

[Middle English tempille, from Old French temple, possibly from Latin templum, small piece of timber; see tem- in Indo-European roots.]

Temple

(ˈtɛmpəl)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) either of two buildings in London and Paris that belonged to the Templars. The one in London now houses two of the chief law societies
2. (Bible) any of three buildings or groups of buildings erected by the Jews in ancient Jerusalem for the worship of Jehovah

Temple

(ˈtɛmpəl)
n
1. (Biography) Shirley, married name Shirley Temple Black. 1928–2014, US film actress and politician. Her films as a child star include Little Miss Marker (1934), Wee Willie Winkie (1937), and Heidi (1937). She was US ambassador to Ghana (1974–76) and to Czechoslovakia (1989–92)
2. (Biography) Sir William. 1628–99, English diplomat and essayist. He negotiated the Triple Alliance (1668) and the marriage of William of Orange to Mary II
3. (Biography) William. 1881–1944, English prelate and advocate of social reform; archbishop of Canterbury (1942–44)

temple

(ˈtɛmpəl)
n
(Textiles) the part of a loom that keeps the cloth being woven stretched to the correct width
[C15: from French, from Latin templum a small timber]

Temple

(ˈtɛmpəl)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) either of two buildings in London and Paris that belonged to the Templars. The one in London now houses two of the chief law societies
2. (Bible) any of three buildings or groups of buildings erected by the Jews in ancient Jerusalem for the worship of Jehovah

Temple

(ˈtɛmpəl)
n
1. (Biography) Shirley, married name Shirley Temple Black. 1928–2014, US film actress and politician. Her films as a child star include Little Miss Marker (1934), Wee Willie Winkie (1937), and Heidi (1937). She was US ambassador to Ghana (1974–76) and to Czechoslovakia (1989–92)
2. (Biography) Sir William. 1628–99, English diplomat and essayist. He negotiated the Triple Alliance (1668) and the marriage of William of Orange to Mary II
3. (Biography) William. 1881–1944, English prelate and advocate of social reform; archbishop of Canterbury (1942–44)

tem•ple1

(ˈtɛm pəl)

n.
1. an edifice or place dedicated to the service or worship of a deity.
2. (usu. cap.) any of the three successive houses of worship in Jerusalem in use by the Jews in Biblical times.
3. a synagogue.
4. a church, esp. a large or imposing one.
5. any place or object in which God dwells, as the body of a Christian. I Cor. 6:19.
6. (in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints) a building for sacred ordinances.
7. any large or pretentious public building.
8. (cap.) either of two groups of buildings on the site of the Templars' former establishment in London, occupied by two of the Inns of Court.
9. a building used by a fraternal order.
[before 900; Middle English, variant of tempel, Old English < Latin templum space demarcated by an augur for taking auspices, temple]

tem•ple2

(ˈtɛm pəl)

n.
1. the region of the face that lies on either side of the forehead.
2. either of the sidepieces of a pair of eyeglasses extending back above the ears.
[1275–1325; Middle English < Middle French < Vulgar Latin *tempula, for Latin tempora the temples, pl. (taken as feminine singular) of tempus temple]

Tem•ple

(ˈtɛm pəl)

n.
1. Shirley (Shirley Temple Black), born 1928, U.S. film actress and diplomat.
2. Sir William, 1628–99, English essayist and diplomat.

Temple

 a local group of Oddfellows.

temple

A place of worship particularly associated with classical Greek architecture.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.temple - place of worship consisting of an edifice for the worship of a deitytemple - place of worship consisting of an edifice for the worship of a deity
joss house - a Chinese temple or shrine for idol worship
pagoda - an Asian temple; usually a pyramidal tower with an upward curving roof
pantheon - (antiquity) a temple to all the gods
house of God, house of prayer, house of worship, place of worship - any building where congregations gather for prayer
2.temple - the flat area on either side of the forehead; "the veins in his temple throbbed"
head, caput - the upper part of the human body or the front part of the body in animals; contains the face and brains; "he stuck his head out the window"
feature, lineament - the characteristic parts of a person's face: eyes and nose and mouth and chin; "an expression of pleasure crossed his features"; "his lineaments were very regular"
3.temple - an edifice devoted to special or exalted purposes
building, edifice - a structure that has a roof and walls and stands more or less permanently in one place; "there was a three-story building on the corner"; "it was an imposing edifice"
pillar, column - (architecture) a tall vertical cylindrical structure standing upright and used to support a structure
entablature - (architecture) the structure consisting of the part of a classical temple above the columns between a capital and the roof
ziggurat, zikkurat, zikurat - a rectangular tiered temple or terraced mound erected by the ancient Assyrians and Babylonians
4.temple - (Judaism) the place of worship for a Jewish congregationtemple - (Judaism) the place of worship for a Jewish congregation
house of God, house of prayer, house of worship, place of worship - any building where congregations gather for prayer
Judaism - the monotheistic religion of the Jews having its spiritual and ethical principles embodied chiefly in the Torah and in the Talmud

temple

1

temple

2 noun
Related words
adjective temporal
Translations
صَدْغ الإنْسان، أحَدُ جانِبَي الجَبينمَعْبَدهَيْكَل، مَعبَد
храм
chrámspáneksvatyně
tempeltinding
temppeliohimo
hram
halántéktemplom
kuil
musterigagnaugahof
寺院
신전
templum
deniņisvētnīcatemplis
chrám
tempeljsence
tempel
วัด
đền

temple

[ˈtempl] N
1. (Rel) → templo m
2. (Anat) → sien f
3. the Temple (in London) → el Colegio de Abogados

temple

[ˈtɛmpəl] n
(= building) → temple m
(part of the head)tempe f

temple

1
n (Rel) → Tempel m

temple

2
n (Anat) → Schläfe f

temple

[ˈtɛmpl] n
a. (Rel) → tempio
b. (Anat) → tempia

temple1

(ˈtempl) noun
a building in which people worship, usually as part of a non-Christian religion. a Greek/Hindu temple.

temple2

(ˈtempl) noun
either of the flat parts of the head at the side of the forehead. The stone hit him on the temple.

temple

مَعْبَد chrám tempel Tempel ναός templo temppeli temple hram tempio 寺院 신전 tempel tempel świątynia templo храм tempel วัด tapınak đền 庙宇

tem·ple

n. sien, superficie lisa a cada lado de la parte lateral de la cabeza.

temple

n (anat) sien f
References in classic literature ?
Quitzel, so the story goes, wanted to be the chief god, and when the image of a rival was set up in the temple near him, he toppled over in anger, and part of the temple went with him, the whole place being buried in ruins.
There were a few freckles on her face, and a small, dark mole near the under lip and one on the temple, half-hidden in her hair.
You have no warranty for such an audacious doctrine, nor any covenant to support it," cried David who was deeply tinctured with the subtle distinctions which, in his time , and more especially in his province, had been drawn around the beautiful simplicity of revelation, by endeavoring to penetrate the awful mystery of the divine nature, supplying faith by self-sufficiency, and by consequence, involving those who reasoned from such human dogmas in absurdities and doubt; "your temple is reared on the sands, and the first tempest will wash away its foundation.
The surprise of such a discovery, his agitation, alarm, and horror, brought on the crisis of a disorder to which the old bachelor had an hereditary liability; he seemed to choke with blood, and fell upon the floor, striking his temple a heavy blow against the corner of a table.
Coming downstairs to meet my colleague in the hall, I remembered a pair of gloves that had required three stitches and that had received them-- with a publicity perhaps not edifying--while I sat with the children at their tea, served on Sundays, by exception, in that cold, clean temple of mahogany and brass, the "grown-up" dining room.
He leaves all his deliverance to God, contenting himself with this, that spite of all his pains and pangs, he will still look towards His holy temple.
But ploughed up to the primary rock of the matter, the two great principles laid down in the twin whaling laws previously quoted, and applied and elucidated by Lord Ellenborough in the above cited case; these two laws touching Fast-Fish and Loose-Fish, I say, will, on reflection, be found the fundamentals of all human jurisprudence; For notwithstanding its complicated tracery of sculpture, the Temple of the Law, like the Temple of the Philistines, has but two props to stand on.
Who drove out the businessmen and brokers from the temple with a whip
From this time, an inviolable sphere of peace encompassed the lowly heart of the oppressed one,--an ever-present Saviour hallowed it as a temple.
Genius is a light which makes the darkness visible, like the lightning's flash, which perchance shatters the temple of knowledge itself--and not a taper lighted at the hearthstone of the race, which pales before the light of common day.
When I saw "King Lear" played, nobody was allowed to see a scene shifted; if there was nothing to be done but slide a forest out of the way and expose a temple beyond, one did not see that forest split itself in the middle and go shrieking away, with the accompanying disenchanting spectacle of the hands and heels of the impelling impulse--no, the curtain was always dropped for an instant--one heard not the least movement behind it--but when it went up, the next instant, the forest was gone.
The climbing fire lit up their faces and threw its ruddy glare upon the pillared tree-trunks of their forest temple, and upon the varnished foliage and festooning vines.