tenet

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ten·et

 (tĕn′ĭt)
n.
A doctrine, principle, or position held as part of a philosophy, religion, or field of endeavor.

[Probably from Medieval Latin, from Latin, third person sing. present indicative of tenēre, to hold; see ten- in Indo-European roots.]

tenet

(ˈtɛnɪt; ˈtiːnɪt)
n
a belief, opinion, or dogma
[C17: from Latin, literally: he (it) holds, from tenēre to hold]

ten•et

(ˈtɛn ɪt; Brit. also ˈti nɪt)

n.
any opinion, principle, doctrine, dogma, etc., esp. one held as true by members of a profession, group, or movement.
[1590–1600; < Latin: he holds]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tenet - a religious doctrine that is proclaimed as true without proof
article of faith, credendum - (Christianity) any of the sections into which a creed or other statement of doctrine is divided
church doctrine, religious doctrine, creed, gospel - the written body of teachings of a religious group that are generally accepted by that group

tenet

noun principle, rule, doctrine, creed, view, teaching, opinion, belief, conviction, canon, thesis, maxim, dogma, precept, article of faith Non-violence is the central tenet of their faith.

tenet

noun
A principle taught or advanced for belief, as by a religious or philosophical group:
Translations

tenet

[ˈtenət] Nprincipio m

tenet

[ˈtɛnɪt] nprincipe mten-gallon hat n (US)chapeau m de cow-boy

tenet

nLehrsatz m; (Rel) → Glaubenssatz m

tenet

[ˈtɛnət] nprincipio
References in classic literature ?
But, after all, what worked most to the young carpenter's disadvantage was, first, the reserve and sternness of his natural disposition, and next, the fact of his not being a church-communicant, and the suspicion of his holding heretical tenets in matters of religion and polity.
Her theological tenets were all made up, labelled in most positive and distinct forms, and put by, like the bundles in her patch trunk; there were just so many of them, and there were never to be any more.
I shall devote myself for a time to the examination of the Roman Catholic dogmas, and to a careful study of the workings of their system: if I find it to be, as I half suspect it is, the one best calculated to ensure the doing of all things decently and in order, I shall embrace the tenets of Rome and probably take the veil.
So far is the general sense of mankind from corresponding with the tenets of those who endeavor to lull asleep our apprehensions of discord and hostility between the States, in the event of disunion, that it has from long observation of the progress of society become a sort of axiom in politics, that vicinity or nearness of situation, constitutes nations natural enemies.
Whatever may be the arguments or inducements which have wrought this change in the sentiments and declarations of these gentlemen, it certainly would not be wise in the people at large to adopt these new political tenets without being fully convinced that they are founded in truth and sound policy.
If you will interpret the word INTOLERANCE as FIRMNESS OF PRINCIPLE, if you do not wish to condemn in the catholic soul of the Abbe de Sponde the stoicism which Walter Scott has made you admire in the puritan soul of Jeanie Deans' father; if you are willing to recognize in the Roman Church the Potius mori quam foedari that you admire in republican tenets,--you will understand the sorrow of the Abbe de Sponde when he saw in his niece's salon the apostate priest, the renegade, the pervert, the heretic, that enemy of the Church, the guilty taker of the Constitutional oath.
Introducing the often discussed subject of the Quakers, he gave a history of that sect, and a description of their tenets, in which error predominated, and prejudice distorted the aspect of what was true.
Their lodgings were in a cottage a little further along the lane, but they came and assisted Tess in her departure, and argued that she should dress up in her very prettiest guise to captivate the hearts of her parents-in-law; though she, knowing of the austere and Calvinistic tenets of old Mr Clare, was indifferent, and even doubtful.
A swollen conscience caused him to see and hear even more than was warranted by his position, and his uncompromising nature compelled him to act on whatsoever he heard or saw: a savage custodian of public morals, he had in addition a perverse enthusiasm for lost causes, loved a minority for its own sake, and untenable tenets for theirs.
To him it meant the Church of England, and not to believe in its tenets was a sign of wilfulness which could not fail of punishment here or hereafter.
Minchin that his religious sympathies were of a general kind, and such as gave a distant medical sanction to all serious sentiment, whether of Church or Dissent, rather than any adhesion to particular tenets.
For a writer of his peculiar philosophic tenets, at all events, the world itself, in truth, must seem irretrievably old or even decadent.