Tennessee


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Related to Tennessee: Tennessee State University

Ten·nes·see

 (tĕn′ĭ-sē′, tĕn′ĭ-sē′) Abbr. TN or Tenn.
A state of the southeast United States. It was admitted as the 16th state in 1796. Visited by the Spanish in 1540, the region was explored by Daniel Boone in 1769 and became part of the United States in 1783. The short-lived state of Franklin (1784-1788) formed the basis for the Territory of the United States South of the River Ohio (1790) and the later state of Tennessee. Nashville is the capital and Memphis the largest city.

Ten′nes·se′an adj. & n.

Tennessee

(ˌtɛnɪˈsiː)
n
1. (Placename) a state of the E central US: consists of a plain in the west, rising to the Appalachians and the Cumberland Plateau in the east. Capital: Nashville. Pop: 5 841 748 (2003 est). Area: 109 412 sq km (42 244 sq miles). Abbreviation: Tenn or TN (with zip code)
2. (Placename) a river in the E central US, flowing southwest from E Tennessee into N Alabama, then west and north to the Ohio River at Paducah: the longest tributary of the Ohio; includes a series of dams and reservoirs under the Tennessee Valley Authority. Length: 1049 km (652 miles)

Ten•nes•see

(ˌtɛn əˈsi)

n.
1. a state in the SE United States. 5,689,283; 42,246 sq. mi. (109,415 sq. km). Cap.: Nashville. Abbr.: TN, Tenn.
2. a river flowing from E Tennessee through N Alabama, W Tennessee, and SW Kentucky into the Ohio near Paducah. 652 mi. (1050 km) long.
Ten`nes•se′an, adj., n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Tennessee - a state in east central United StatesTennessee - a state in east central United States
battle of Chattanooga, Chattanooga - in the American Civil War (1863) the Union armies of Hooker, Thomas, and Sherman under the command of Ulysses S. Grant won a decisive victory over the Confederate Army under Braxton Bragg
battle of Pittsburgh Landing, battle of Shiloh, Shiloh - the second great battle of the American Civil War (1862); the battle ended with the withdrawal of Confederate troops but it was not a Union victory
Great Smoky Mountains National Park - a national park in Tennessee and North Carolina that includes the highest mountain in the eastern United States
U.S.A., United States, United States of America, US, USA, America, the States, U.S. - North American republic containing 50 states - 48 conterminous states in North America plus Alaska in northwest North America and the Hawaiian Islands in the Pacific Ocean; achieved independence in 1776
Confederacy, Confederate States, Confederate States of America, Dixie, Dixieland, South - the southern states that seceded from the United States in 1861
South - the region of the United States lying to the south of the Mason-Dixon line
Chattanooga - a city in eastern Tennessee
Columbia - a town in west central Tennessee
Jackson - a town in western Tennessee
Johnson City - a town in northeastern Tennessee
Knoxville - a city in eastern Tennessee on the Tennessee River
Memphis - largest city of Tennessee; located in southwestern Tennessee on bluffs overlooking the Mississippi River
capital of Tennessee, Nashville - capital of the state of Tennessee; located in the north central part of the state on the Cumberland River; known for country music
Clinch River - a river that rises in southwestern Virginia and flows generally southwestward across eastern Tennessee to the Tennessee River
Cumberland River, Cumberland - a river that rises in southeastern Kentucky and flows westward through northern Tennessee to become a tributary of the Ohio River in southwestern Kentucky
Tennessee River, Tennessee - a river formed by the confluence of two other rivers near Knoxville; it follows a U-shaped course to become a tributary of the Ohio River in western Kentucky
2.Tennessee - a river formed by the confluence of two other rivers near KnoxvilleTennessee - a river formed by the confluence of two other rivers near Knoxville; it follows a U-shaped course to become a tributary of the Ohio River in western Kentucky
Bluegrass State, Kentucky, KY - a state in east central United States; a border state during the American Civil War; famous for breeding race horses
Tennessee, TN, Volunteer State - a state in east central United States
References in classic literature ?
Nay, his busy fancy already realized his hopes, and presented to him the blooming Katrina, with a whole family of children, mounted on the top of a wagon loaded with household trumpery, with pots and kettles dangling beneath; and he beheld himself bestriding a pacing mare, with a colt at her heels, setting out for Kentucky, Tennessee, --or the Lord knows where!
Why did the poor poet of Tennessee, upon suddenly receiving two handfuls of silver, deliberate whether to buy him a coat, which he sadly needed, or invest his money in a pedestrian trip to Rockaway Beach?
Well, this man arrived from Tennessee about nine o'clock, one morning, with a black coachman and a splendid four-horse carriage and an elegant dog, which he was evidently fond of and proud of; he drove up before Gadsby's, and the clerk and the landlord and everybody rushed out to take charge of him, but he said,
Never mind,' and jumped out and told the coachman to wait--said he hadn't time to take anything to eat, he only had a little claim against the government to collect, would run across the way, to the Treasury, and fetch the money, and then get right along back to Tennessee, for he was in considerable of a hurry.
But Shakespeare and the rest have to walk behind a common tailor from Tennessee, by the name of Billings; and behind a horse-doctor named Sakka, from Afghanistan.
These latter came out of a dozen rivers-- the Illinois, the Missouri, the Upper Mississippi, the Ohio, the Monongahela, the Tennessee, the Red River, the White River, and so on--and were bound every whither and stocked with every imaginable comfort or necessity, which the Mississippi's communities could want, from the frosty Falls of St.
The former was a native of Tennessee, about six feet high, strong built, dark complexioned, brave in spirit, though mild in manners.
This terrible secret society was formed by some ex-Confederate soldiers in the Southern states after the Civil War, and it rapidly formed local branches in different parts of the country, notably in Tennessee, Louisiana, the Carolinas, Georgia, and Florida.
In his youth Halpin Frayser had lived with his parents in Nashville, Tennessee.
The Merrimac, the Monitor, the Tennessee, the Weehawken discharged enormous projectiles themselves, after having been armor-clad against the projectiles of others.
They traveled in this way through the east of the Union, Pennsylvania, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Vermont, Maine, and New Hampshire; the north and west by New York, Ohio, Michigan, and Wisconsin; returning to the south by Illinois, Missouri, Arkansas, Texas, and Louisiana; they went to the southeast by Alabama and Florida, going up by Georgia and the Carolinas, visiting the center by Tennessee, Kentucky, Virginia, and Indiana, and, after quitting the Washington station, re-entered Baltimore, where for four days one would have thought that the United States of America were seated at one immense banquet, saluting them simultaneously with the same hurrahs
Look here, old trapper: few men love Ishmael Bush and his seven sledge-hammer sons less than one Paul Hover; but I scorn to slander even a Tennessee shotgun.

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