pejorative

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Related to Term of derision: pejoratives

pe·jor·a·tive

 (pĭ-jôr′ə-tĭv, -jŏr′-, pĕj′ə-rā′tĭv, pē′jə-)
adj.
Disparaging; belittling: "The label Neandertal took on a pejorative connotation decades ago; it implied boorishness at best and stupidity at worst" (Craig Stanford).
n.
A disparaging or belittling word or expression.

pe·jor′a·tive·ly adv.

pejorative

(pɪˈdʒɒrətɪv; ˈpiːdʒər-)
adj
(of words, expressions, etc) having an unpleasant or disparaging connotation
n
a pejorative word, expression, etc
[C19: from French péjoratif, from Late Latin pējōrātus, past participle of pējōrāre to make worse, from Latin pēior worse]
peˈjoratively adv

pe•jo•ra•tive

(pɪˈdʒɔr ə tɪv, -ˈdʒɒr-, ˈpɛdʒ əˌreɪ-, ˈpi dʒə-)

adj.
1. having a disparaging, derogatory, or belittling effect or force, as a word.
n.
2. a pejorative form or word, as poetaster.
[1880–85; < Late Latin pējōrāt(us), past participle of pējōrāre, derivative of pējor worse]
pe•jo′ra•tive•ly, adv.

pejorative

Used to describe an expression that means something unpleasant or derogatory.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.pejorative - expressing disapproval; "dyslogistic terms like `nitwit' and `scalawag'"
uncomplimentary - tending to (or intended to) detract or disparage

pejorative

pejorative

adjective
Translations
pejorativnípejorativum
pejorativPejorativum
denigrerendkleinerendpejoratief
peiorativ

pejorative

[pɪˈdʒɒrətɪv] ADJpeyorativo, despectivo

pejorative

[pɪˈdʒɒrətɪv] adjpéjoratif/ive

pejorative

adj, pejoratively

pejorative

[pɪˈdʒɒrɪtɪv] adjspregiativo/a, peggiorativo/a
References in classic literature ?
Robert Macaire is the hero of two favorite melodramas -- "Chien de Montargis" and "Chien d'Aubry" -- and the name is applied to bold criminals as a term of derision.
At the 1831 Paris Salon a new term of derision was born.
term of derision aimed at countries that deemed it advisable to observe certain policy limits in order to live peaceably as neighbors of the Soviet Union.
A change in culture, so that health and safety is no longer a term of derision, but a wise, safety-first philosophy.
It was another example of "stupid English money" first coined by German media, now a Europe-wide term of derision.