testation


Related to testation: Attestation clause

testation

(tɛsˈteɪʃən)
n
witness or evidencethe dispersal of property through a will
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Ian Harrabin, the Ian Harrabin, the man behind Fargo Village and the Far Gosford project, said: "We were alongside some very large regeneration generation projects and to be listed in that company and ny and rewarded with a special commendacial commendation is a real testation is a real testament to everyone ment to everyone who has worked on Fargo.
116) While stating that a revocable trust, even one over which the settlor retains extensive rights, is not testamentary (that is, need not be executed with will formalities), such "a trust is ordinarily subject to substantive restrictions on testation," including the elective share.
Professor Mark Glover suggests a quite different purpose served by will formalities, at odds with the functions addressed so far, and implicitly distinguishing formalizing rules for wills from those applicable to other transfers: namely, to obstruct rather than to facilitate testation.
It discusses why the policies underlying freedom of testation depart from those behind freedom of contract and provide less support for a laissez faire regime.
However, the principle of freedom of testation has never been so sacrosanct to the English common law that it has been totally without limit:</p>
By understanding this rule, CPAs will be better prepared to avoid violating it themselves, help clients select an investment adviser and offer at testation services to investment advisers.
70) Freedom of testation, after all, is part and parcel of ownership:
BILLIKENS : BULKINESS CARMANIAN : CERTATION DUSKINESS : DISLIKENS TESTATION : TASMANIAN GUNRUNNER : GUNBURNER HEMATOSIS : HAMITESES OUTBARKED : OUTRANKED MALINESES : MELANOSIS MOSTLINGS : MISPLANTS PIEPLANTS : POETLINGS
It is also efficient in avoiding probate, thereby serving as an easy-to-use substitute for the more cumbersome route of testation via a will.
194) By conceiving of will contracts as agreements performed literally by acts of testation, courts have sometimes gone astray, penalizing parties for breaches that are in truth illusory (or, even within the traditional framework of contract law, not material).
Our fundamental value in the law of wills is freedom of testation, but the inner tendencies of civil jury trial put our procedural system in conflict with our substantive law.
One of the early arguments against freedom of testation in Great Britain was that testators "visited with sickness, in their extreme agonies and pains," might dispose of their estates "indiscreetly and unadvisedly.